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February 1896


1 February 1896 • Saturday

wea. beautiful day

this morning very dreary and I was very weary late in getting up town– Meeting at 4 p.m. of general committee. very satisfactory and most affairs settled. Went to Annie’s to sleep– Cavendish [W. Cannon] birthday one year old– took him a silver spoon– sent one to Daisie’s new baby engraved S. T. A. children delighted, had a visit with John J. [Q.] and Annie very pleasant, sat up quite late– {p. 68}

2 February 1896 • Sunday

wea. cold, chilly and miserable

Rose late went to Christian G. [Christeen Golden] Kimball’s funeral, Angus M. Cannon President S.L. Stake B. [Brigham] H. Roberts, A. [Abram] H. Cannon speakers. went up to Abbie [Wells Chapin]’s to lunch and afterwards came home and wrote etc. It was a dark and dreary day, Apostle Abram H. Cannon preached in the Tabernacle. I came home tired had dinner at Belle’s and a pleasant evening reading and writing– Elise came and the usual routine of wood coal and water. I have many reflections in looking back over the past, it seems extraordinary that things are as they are. The Lord is on our side and we shall be victorious. One cannot determine what is coming or make any sure calculation {p. 69}

3 February 1896 • Monday

wea. dark and damp wind at evening

<I sent my letter to Pres. [George Q.] Cannon>

This has been a wonderful & a terrible day– Letter from Mrs. Corinne M. Allen in reference to me and to W.S.A. in Salt Lake City and Utah and trying to settle up the party affairs etc. and to other matters pertaining to my affairs–

The Club met and discussion upon political science study brought out many opinions from members, some new and inexperienced ones, and resulted in a change of program of different method. Sisters Richards & Boyer returned today from Washington Convention and called at the office– They are in good health and spirits, this evening press broke over at the News Office and could not get papers mailed– very weary and low spirited– it seems too gloomy for anything {p. 70}

4 February 1896 • Tuesday

wea. sunny and warmer

Br. Penrose birthday, he is 64 today, his folks have had a new suit of clothes made for him– he dined at Sister [Romania Bunnell] Pratt’s– she is a devoted wife. I tried all I could to get a few ladies to go to the Legislature Mrs. Bennett and Helena Wells both went also Mrs. [Florence Guthrie] Varian I am so annoyed that women do not accept the responsibility of the franchise, and try to look into matters more deeply than they do. We had a nice time together and after being a while in the Senate went into the House– I came home quite exhausted– the News boys took my mail– Letters are coming in from all quarters giving proceedings on the 31st of Jan. Letters from my own family are very scarce just now Adeline [Woodward Earl] has been to see me– {p. 71}

5 February 1896 • Wednesday

wea. drizzling and damp

Bishop Newel K. Whitney would have been 101. years old today if he had lived– a great man with analytical mind, ready to explain in the finest degree principles and to substantiate truths in the same way. There are few men in the world like him– upright honest and chaste– I worked hard and even run about to try and get ladies to go to the Legislature with me, succeeded at last in getting a few– The Senate passed the age of consent bill at eighteen, but would not have been absent passed if we had not been present– we were told positively that was the case. I sent off several bills to subscribers– am much in need of money to pay bills otherwise I must not expect to succeed– {p. 72}

6 February 1896 • Thursday

wea. clear & cold–

<Little Newel 50 today1> This morning went up to the office in pretty good time– many letters mostly on the party affairs, Miss [Laura C.] Sapp came for material for manuscript paper, for Chautauqua Club– about Elizabeth Cady Stanton– Well I have been running in and out all day long, up to Mrs. McVicker to see about Federation Club Book which requires time and thought– so do all these matters. I have been several times to the typos– and have had many callers and I am very weary indeed. Some unpleasant developments were made today in the police management of the City which caused a commotion and the papers are full of sensational matter in consequence.2 I am very low-spirited and am all alone in the house. {p. 73}

7 February 1896 • Friday

wea. bright sunshine

This morning I was full of grief and could scarcely settle to any thing, but after going over to see Belle went up to the office and to the President’s office and printing office and the taypose [typos] and on errands here and there– Many letters have come in from different places respecting the Clebration and giving particulars of a good time and happiness, in the meetings or parties. Aunt Zina has gone to Ogden to Chariton [Jacob]’s, I have tried in vain to see Br. [George Q.] Cannon again today. I shall be obliged to get an answer of some kind tomorrow. I have been very much absorbed in my work today– Kindergarten meeting this afternoon– Mr. Bassett came to advocate his opperatta for an entertainment in the Theatre– {p. 74}

8 February 1896 • Saturday

wea. a perfect day

Too lovely and bright to stay in the house– one cannot help feeling tempted to stay out of doors– the City is full of people from the country– paper is not out as I expected and it is a disappointment bought a violet jar for Emmeline a book The Old Garden, and some pink and red carnations. Went down to have dinner and had a very pleasant time– the day had been a disagreeable one in the way of callers– and trying to convince women of their political duties. I was very weary and discouraged and had to be determined. Little Emmeline came up with her mother in the afternoon and looked too sweet for words. She is very bright and witty. We had a sociable evening after the children were in bed talked over many things {p. 75}

9 February 1896 • Sunday

wea. not so bright as yesterday

Stayed at Annie’s until about noon– came home and dressed and made myself ready to go to Hebe’s [Heber M. Wells] found Margaret [Judd] Clawson there when I went in– the rest came from the meeting. Martha [Harris Wells], Em. [Emily Harris] Bullock, and Mrs. [Marion Mumford] Beatie– Bishop [Hiram B.] Clawson came at last and the name was talked of then decided it should be Florence [Wells]– and Hebe held the baby while Bishop Clawson the grandfather pronounced the blessing– then we had dinner– roast turkey and several other dishes ice cream & cakes etc. Bishop [William B.] Preston and Apostle Teasdale preached at the Tabernacle– Elder Penrose was to preach in the 12th. Ward to night– Belle seems fairly cheerful– I am simply distressed– have read my revise & Federation Book {p. 76}

10 February 1896 • Monday

wea. Very bright & warm day

Went very early to the Office many letters from different places telling of the celebration of Sister Zina’s birthday, and so on. Took up the revise clear up the stairs and across the way to the farther office, the same road I have been going over 21 years now ever since I came into the paper– went to the meeting of the Committee on Agriculture in the City and County Building fourth story up all those stairs found them in session and Mrs. Bennett and Mrs. Caine already there lobbying. Jos. [Joseph R.] Murdock of Wasatch, Chairman– very gracious to us– The D. & A. M. Society’s3 charter was up for discussion and as to whether it should be revoked. The Kindergarten held a meeting in reference to an Operatta. Tried again today to see President Cannon and did not succeed. wrote to Mrs. [Margherita] Hamm Fales anto [and to] Mrs. [Ellen Clark] Sargent of San Francisco to night {p. 77}

11 February 1896 • Tuesday

wea. dark and misty– & morning too.

Today I feel very miserable but succeeded in getting the ear of the Presidency in reference to the letters I wished to show them– President Cannon was very courteous and polite and also President Woodruff– Angus M. Cannon <Sen.> is quite ill, I have been delayed with many other things because of the desire to see the Presidency– Aunt Zina is in Ogden Chariton’s wife4 has a baby–5 Jote Beatie [Josephine Beatie Burton] was confined to-day After finishing work calling on the Governor and several other things I went up to Martha’s and had dinner and spent the evening– Emily Bullock was there from Pleasant Grove and we all went over to Jode [Joseph S. Wells]’s and stayed a couple of hours. Both Edna [Wells Sloan] & Emily [Wells Grant] are in an interesting condition, Edna for the first time about or nearly six months– I suppose she is quite happy about it– {p. 78}

12 February 1896 • Wednesday

wea. not very fine–

I have written to Mr. C. E. Allen thanking him for the Congressional records and to Mell in San Francisco– today I have to go to the Federation Meeting (preliminary) at the Industrial Building at 1/2 past eleven– I was late in coming up in town. Went off to the meeting took Club books about one hundred– Mrs. McVicker was present to preside Mrs. [Amy Stephenson] Corlew and Mrs. [Emma White] Bannister from Ogden and Mrs. Reid [Etta Swarthout Reed] and Miss [Josephine] Kellogg from Provo, Miss [Catherine M.] Dougall from Springville– lunch was handsomely served and business opened in Ladies’ Literary Club Room at one p.m. after much business that was included in the exercises new matters were taken up– & various opinions given– I was obliged to ask to be excused and came home to find several people waiting for me Anna Eva Fay6 is in town. I called at the hotel to see her, went to the lecture in the evening {p. 79}

13 February 1896 • Thursday

wea. bright sunshine

Went up town just after twelve– have had many people today– some agreeable and others the reverse– worked hard but could not finish mailing– came home and did a little writing and went to bed before twelve but not to sleep– My mind is troubled and I have had many shocks that have unnerved me in a great measure, and I cannot be quite myself– I have tried hard to control matters and to exercise great faith and to draw near to the Lord, but do as I will my heart is sad. I cannot seem to make things as I feel I ought to do, in consequence of opposition– There is a new moon today and it will be moonlight towards the latter part of the month when my birthday comes in– I came home weary and ready to faint with exhaustion– {p. 80}

14 February 1896 • Friday

wea. bright and clear

Called on Belle early this morning– she seemed more cheerful– I spoke of my dream about Mrs. [Julia Murdock] Farnsworth and the house– Came up to the office and found several callers had been in Sarah Jane [Jenne] Cannon came and talked with me about her biographical sketch. I am very glad she is to be in the article– almost every one I have spoken to seems pleased. Aunt Zina has not come home yet from Ogden; I do not know how to dilly dally so long over the matter– The Kindergarten ladies met and canvassed the opera question and decided to have the entertainment on the 28th. and 29th of February. I became very weary and nervous, and could scarcely get through the meeting. Went to see Mrs. Farnsworth afterwards found her feeling very miserable but cheerful & quite happy in the new home– {p. 81}

15 February 1896 • Saturday

wea. (bright & warm)

Came home late, did some recording in the R.S. Record;– those who never do these things know very little about it– the anxiety and thought and actual work of recording. Today Susan B. Anthony is 76 years old– I presume she has had many gifts and messages I should love to send her some sweet token from here but really feel I cannot. I love her very much and my heart goes out to her, but when one has not means they cannot bestow upon even those they love. I called at Judge [Charles S.] Zane’s and left a message with his wife–7 then went to Mrs. Salisbury’s and had lunch with Mrs. Walker & Stella [Salisbury]– Met Mrs. James Walker [Mary Scannell Walker] there– then worked at the mailing– Amelia F. Young and her cousin Miss Folsom called and several other ladies– Hebe sent the letter for Mrs. Sargent– went to Myra [Almira Young] Russell’s birthday party {p. 82} took her some flowers quite a gay party– Ria [Maria Young] Dougall Dr. [Ellis Reynolds] Shipp Dr. [Elvira Stevens] Barney and many others.

16 February 1896 • Sunday

wea. clear and bright (perfect day

Today the Sabbath I slept at Annie’s had a social evening and came home soon as breakfast was over– found Sister Emma [Smith] Woodruff had already called, and so went over there directly and had a talk with her about the Sketch. President Woodruff was just eating his breakfast. Walked back enjoyed the fresh air and set to letter-writing, wrote to Daisie and Verona [Dunford Hillard] and to Mrs. Salisbury and Jane S. [Snyder] Richards and Susan [Noble] Grant and to [blank line] Louise and Margaret came down Belle was over three times today, she is very restless and unhappy– I went up to Annie’s and invited John Q. and Annie to go with me to call on Miss Fay but they did not think it opportune {p. 83}

17 February 1896 • Monday

wea. lovely day

This morning I was to go before th Agricultural Committee of the State Legislature– but was so late in getting up town having had a very uncomfortable night and feeling weary & distressed– I went down however and learned that no meeting had been hild [held]– but an adjournment taken until tomorrow. Came back, and talked with several ladies about pedigree and so on, then the Club met and we had some practical lessons on politics and Annie Hyde gave us another series of her travels in Europe. I came home and did some special writing and considerable reading. The night was one of the most perfect I ever knew moon & starlight and so serene and peaceful. I went to call on Miss Fay took Jean [Jeanne Alford] & Lucile [Sears] in the evening attended the theatre performan {p. 84}

18 February 1896 • Tuesday

wea. charming weather

I have been getting the Congressional Record of late & other public documents. Went before a Committee this morning and spoke of the silk interest and the Fairs and women on State Boards Mrs. Caine had been working up the matter beforehand. Afterwards I went up and Belle came we went to the U. P. Office together Aunt Zina came in to say she was going to Ogden to Chariton’s and I called on Anna Eva Fay and we went together to the Senate and House and to see the Governor and we had a long talk about various things in her rooms afterwards– then I called at Mrs. Mc Cune [McCune]’s and she loaned me her carriage to take a ride tomorrow with Miss Fay and my own girls– Sep has been over this evening with his mother– {p. 85}

19 February 1896 • Wednesday

wea. fine but murky around the mountains:

When I went up at half past nine, Mrs. Mc’Cune [McCune]’s carriage was waiting for me & we drove to the Knutsford and then to Annie’s and Lucile joined us there also. We drove on to Capital Hill and through some principal streets and finally took Miss Fay back to the hotel. During the ride Annie and Miss Fay did most of the talking & I enjoyed it very much. She gave a matinee in the afternoon– Sep and Belle were here most of the day out and in– he is going to night via San Francisco to Alaska if he can unless he changes his mind. It is making me very sad and nearly killing Belle– I gave him one of my passes to go and see Miss Fay. the other two to Dr. Shipp– Belle and I parted with him very sadly– <I called on Miss Fay with Emma Sears–> {p. 86} on the sidewalk on Main St. Such a solemn thing, my poor dear boy, my heart aches for him.

20 February 1896 • Thursday

wea. A fine clear day–

This morning Belle is ill, she cannot come up with me, and I am almost as bad my head is nearly splitting with pain. Dr. Pratt Mrs. Caine and myself called upon Miss Fay. Dr. Pratt asked her direct questions about her work and she gave it as scientific as she had already intimated to me. We had a pleasant time, then I stayed a short time after they had gone and she spoke confidentially to me of her family affairs. I received during the day an answer to my questions, she says there is much good for me in the future, I shall go abroad and represent the state there will be great religious & political changes. I gave her some views four and Brigham Young’s picture {p. 87}

21 February 1896 • Friday

wea. a bright day–

This morning Belle brought me word Sir Wm. Windeyer was in San Francisco and would not be here for a few days she thought. However he came this morning, Fisher Harris sent me a message in a note– but so many came in Sister E. S. Taylor, Susan Grant Mrs. Bennett, Jos. E. Taylor and many more; it was very hard for me to get off. Mrs. Jane S. Richards came at last and I had to attend to her. I got ready and went at last and found he had gone up to mine. Came back found both Belle and Annie and we had a pleasant time. Called upon the Presidency met all three of them went to the County Building into the Senate & House & to the Governor’s office, he was not in. Went to his house but did not find him there– bade him good bye about six o’clock & came home and dressed for the ball– a social success. {p. 88} The decorations were very fine, and I enjoyed watching the dancers, there were some very gra[n]d dresses. John Q. and Annie came, Lucile was with me. We came home at half past eleven– Lucile slept with me.

22 February 1896 • Saturday

wea. clear & bright

This morning the papers say Sister [Agnes Steele] Park is dead, from heart failure, Sister [Emeline Parker] Kesler too has died with cancer Emily Richards came as good as pie and began some more of her flourishes– Sister Thomas and Sister Shipp, I hurried away to Annie’s after lunch we went to Lydia Ann [Alley Wells]’s and Emme fell in coming out at the gate and hurt her eye. We heard of Ort [Orson F. Whitney]’s illness with cerebral menengitis. very sad also that Margaret [Whitney] had broken her leg in two places. Had a letter from Miss Anthony, went to Belle’s to dinner, Will [Buchholz] and [John G.] Roberts were both there– Washington’s birthday celebrated {p. 89}

23 February 1896 • Sunday

wea. clear and warm

This morning I tried to rest and stayed in bed late– went over to Belle’s a few minutes. Dot went out riding with Mr. [George Billings] Brastow a fine span of horses: it is a very fine day, I did a few little things and then went to the P.O. and from there to the Tabernacle. George Q. Cannon preached after his son Abram. both spoke in a similar strain upon the Gospel principles, and the United Order– the evils of pride and trusting in riches. Went to Annie’s and stayed all night. We had quite a pleasant evening and talked over the ocean voyage to Germany and missionary experiences;– I slept with Louise who seems to cling to me something after the fashion of Verona– the wind was very high and boisterous premonitions of a storm. {p. 90}

24 February 1896 • Monday

wea. clear & cold.

Went off about ten o’clock and found mail for the girls one letter for me from Lancashire England. Heber S. Grant is very low and suffering greatly. The folks fasted yesterday in his behalf– I went up to Br. Parks [Hamilton G. Park] found all very sad indeed. Br. Park beside himself with grief– the girls bearing up well. Mabelle [Mabel Park Thomas] very much distressed, Belle [Isabella Park Kenner] & Annie [Annabelle Park Midgley] quite calm. Went over to see Clara [Horne] James baby [Florence H. James]– saw Br. & Sister Horne and Mattie [Martha Horne Tingey]– had several sketches of the sisters come in today to read and revise. Sisters E. S. [Elmina Shepard] Taylor, L. D. [Lydia Dunford] Alder, E. W. [Ellen Wilcox] Hyde, J. C. [Julia Cruse] Howe, M. M. [Mary Mitchell] Pitchforth– Mr. [Septimus Wagstaff] Sears has had a call to go to St. Louis and starts tonight. Belle had a letter from Sep [Septimus Whitney Sears] from San Francisco– I received a book Daily Strength for Daily Needs from Br. Hiram [W. Clark] for my birthday– {p. 91}

25 February 1896 • Tuesday

wea. dismal and damp

A very dreary kind of day, the folks over the way quite exhausted and trying to rest– I am simply worn to a thread, I cannot do all I desire and it worries me terribly. Letters come pouring in from all quarters about the birthday. I have a letter today from Susan B. Anthony telling me she will go through Ogden to California and let me know in time– so I shall see her again– I am trying my very best to get the sisters to send photographs and sketches of their lives to me for Margherita Arlina Hamm Fales8 to embody in an article for the Peterson’s magazine. I was very anxious to go to the Legislature today but could not. I had a letter from Mrs. [Margaret Walker] Salisbury she says I shall hear from her before the 29th. of February. Wrote to Mrs. C. E. Allen to Washington– {p. 92}

26 February 1896 • Wednesday

The sisters come in with their sketches slowly and they are never complete, I went over to the Temple today and had a talk with Aunt Zina about several things She told me of her call upon President Woodruff and what he said and that Sister Jane S. Richards was with her, I feel as though it was an artful scheme– it was really nothing. Such a great stir and no sort of depth. Hunted for the Governor, he called on me, but neither of us found the other. Wrote to Mrs. [Harriet Fox] Emerson of Ogden in answer to her inquiries about the Republican party. Have come home thoroughly exhausted and could scarcely keep up to do a few little things necessary. {p. 93}

27 February 1896 • Thursday

wea. dark and damp

This morning mailed letter to Mrs. Emerson Hebe came over and we had some talk about suggestions I had made yesterday in reference to appointments on Deaf and Dumb Institute Board. Went to his office and we talked for some time– he telephoned to Ogden and got a favorable answer. I had a letter from my brother Hiram. He mentions being so often sent to fetch me from my hiding place in the Hemlock grove. Heber S. Grant is dead– son of Heber J. Grant– I sat in the Legislature all the afternoon the members of the Senate were discussing the Election Bill– the appointments of the Governor on the Deaf & Dumb Board were sent in to be considered. Press Club to night single tax continued {p. 94}

28 February 1896 • Friday

wea. wind and snow

Last night was terrific almost a tornado, the house fairly rocked I could not summon help– no one could stand against the wind, I must bear it there was no alternative I was alone I must trust in the Lord and I did.

I have had many foreign letters and they have comforted me very much. Letter from Sister Lucy [Granger Hewlings] today. Poems too to publish9 and stayed to go to Snow White and seven dwarfs in the theatre for the benefit of the Kindergarten, Eugene & Q. went together and Dr. Pratt with me. It was a very creditable performance and I rather enjoyed it, quite as much as I could any thing of the kind. There is no news from Mell Letter from Daisie with good news, doing very well indeed {p. 95}

29 February 1896 • Saturday

wea. dull and windy A.M. fine p.m.

<sixty five ladies at my party> I remained at home during the morning and wrote a letter to Mell, then went up town and had a package from Daisie three pairs of silk stockings and black lace veil from Martin [W. Allen] & Tom [Stephen Thompson Allen]. Flowers carnations & mignonette from Mrs. [Sarah Osgood] Cummings & Mrs. Dale– Red Red roses and ferns exquisite from Ellen Clawson Went to the graveyard and took some flowers. Little Heber S. Grant’s funeral today at 2. p.m. After coming from the cemetery I went down to Annie’s and we had a fine dinner, chicken soup, roast turkey, variety of vegetables and salad olives pickles and jellies, tea ice cream & cake fruits– salted almonds. In the evening went to Belle’s and found the house filled with ladies, those with whom I am most familiar. pleasant program and present of five hundred dollars on publishing my poems in book form {p. 96}

Footnotes

  1. [1]Newel Melchizedek Whitney, son of Newel K. and Elizabeth Ann Smith Whitney, was actually born forty-nine years earlier at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, and died at age nine with a disability that kept him from ever walking. EBW helped care for him as they crossed the plains to Utah. (See EBW, Diary, 6 Feb. 1894.)

  2. [2]“Retrenchment,” Salt Lake Herald, 6 Feb. 1896, 4.

  3. [3]Deseret Agricultural and Manufacturing Society.

  4. [4]Emma Riggs Jacobs.

  5. [5]Mary Jacobs.

  6. [6]Anna Eva Fay was a well-publicized mentalist and medium who corresponded with EBW in 1894. (EBW, Diary, 20 Jan. 1894.)

  7. [7]Margaret Maxey Zane.

  8. [8]Margherita A. Hamm (1867–1906) was a journalist and author. In 1893 she married William E. S. Fales, vice-consul to China, and traveled widely. She was assistant editor for Peterson’s Magazine. (See EBW, Diary, 6 May 1895; J. Cutler Andrews, “Hamm, Margherita Arlina,” in James et al., Notable American Women, 2:125–126.)

  9. [9]This year EBW prepared to publish a selection of her poetry. Musings and Memories: Poems, which was funded by friends and printed by Deseret News Publishing, was formally released in December 1897. (EBW, Diary, 29 Feb. 1896; 11 Dec. 1897.) A second edition was published in 1915. (Madsen, Intimate History, 464.)