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September 1895


1 September 1895 • Sunday

<Elizabeth [Kaighan] Taylor– President [John] Taylor’s wife died Aug. 31.> 1|this morning I felt very weary– went over to Belle’s to breakfast & was reminded it was my little Eugene [H. Harris]’s birthday, he would have been fifty one years old. It was Sunday that he was born– last night there was not a quorum of the U.W.P.C.–2 Dr. Shipp came home yesterday– I wrote to several people today and mailed the letters Received a letter from Mary Lowe Dickinson two in fact and one very nice one from Mr. Chidester of Panguitch– Sep came home about five p.m. and went to his mother’s to dinner– I have not heard from Annie today– My letter to McCallum [Harry S. McCullum] was in the Tribune– I do not like it.3 {p. 273}

2 September 1895 • Monday

Ratificacation in the Theatre– five minutes speeches Mrs. McVicker and myself were the only women, all the others were men– Arthur Brown Judge [Charles W.] Bennett, C. E. Allen, Hebe Wells– Arthur L. Thomas, J. [John] H. Harris. H. McCullum and many more, Glee Club sung– Frank J. Cannon made the principal speech and was most applauded. The meeting was under the Auspices of the Oquirrh Club– Theatre very much decorated with flags and bunting, fine music & lots of singers– all men. Negro Quartette– Mrs. McVicker had a new dress for the occasion very stylish make I wore my pongee trimmed with brown velvet– have had it five years or more– {p. 274}

3 September 1895 • Tuesday

Mrs. McVicker and myself left for Logan seven o’clock train next morning after the Theatre Ratification– Frank Cannon was on the train, he bought us a lunch in Ogden– We reached Logan depot and the ladies were in waiting quite a deputation– We dined at Sarah H. Taylor’s otherwise Sister [Rosina Bieri] Swartz’s. The County Committee met us and made some arrangements for our entertainment and route & evening meeting. Immense streamers were strung across the street with our names painted on them, and much had been done to get the people to turn out– We made a few calls during the afternoon one upon the Presbyterian minister & wife had an enthusiastic meeting {p. 275} and hall beautifully decorated. I spoke over an hour we organized a club, called it the Wells Club after me. Mary Jane Hendrickson President, Mrs. Lundburg lst. Vice– Ida Snowden Secretary. I slept at Br. [Isaac] Smiths whose wife4 is [Martin] Luther Ensign’s daughter. Had a long talk with him during the evening after meeting. There was a very beautiful eclipse visible when we came out of the meeting lasted some time–

4 September 1895 • Wednesday

Sep. 4. two carriage loads of us went to Smithfield and though we were a jolly party, we were just about smothered in dust– arrived late but in time for meeting brushed off the dust and succeeded in organizing. Martha Douglas[s] Secretary. we left as soon as possible drove to Richmond and held meeting at 8. p.m. organized there– {p. 276}

5 September 1895 • Thursday

Phebe A. [Merrill] McNeil Chairman Lucy Cardon Merrill Secretary, Mrs. Almira [Bainbridge] Merrill was our chief support & help. We slept at Sister Merrill’s and Sister Elizabeth Pond Whitney [Lewis]–5 Sister Merrill’s mother drove us over to Logan next morning, it was a very pleasant ride. I called upon Sister Mary Ann [Harris Whittle], Martha [Harris] Wells sister who is very greatly afflicted with rheumatism. We went to Br. Smith to dinner & several ladies were invited to met us. We drove after dinner over to Providence such a pretty place there we met Joseph A. Smith Ch. Co. Com. Held meeting and organized Miss Littie [Charlotte] Pickett Chairman– drove on to Paradise after where we had a crowded house with great enthusiasm & slept there with great discomfort– {p. 277}

6 September 1895 • Friday

Next morning Mrs. McVicker drove to Logan with Mrs. [Anine Dam or Deem] Law our hostess and I went over to Hyrum alone– such a dusty ride and jolted & jostled terribly. was entertained at Br. [Charles F.] Bevan’s and met a large number of ladies. Opera House very elaborately decorated and band of music in attendance. Made the speech of the meeting, large number present Bishop and Reporter for the Utah Journal Democratic organ of Cache Co. After meeting a grand dinner was served at Br. Bevan’s and tables full sat down. As soon as possible we left for Wellsville– the brass band with torch lights were out in front of hall when we arrived– house well filled, organization effected. slept at Br. Jos. [Joseph W.] Howell’s had a nice large room very comfortable {p. 278}

7 September 1895 • Saturday

This morning had a pleasant conversation with Sister [Mary Maughan] Howells and several ladies who called– as train did not leave until afternoon– I had lunch there and some of the sisters stayed Sister Hansen & Sister Howells drove over to Mendon with me where I was to take the train.

The Democratic Convention was held in Ogden on that day <before> and Judge [William H.] King was going down on the train, I spoke to him of John T. Caine’s nomination and he was really rude– saying he was a better candidate than Hebe Wells to say the least– arrived safe and found all well no particular changes– {p. 279}

8 September 1895 • Sunday

Tried to rest in the morning– went to Tabernacle in the Afternoon. Went to the office a few minutes then to Annie’s to see how all the children were– Louise Margaret Daniel & Emmeline had gone to the Park for a drive in the pony cart– and to hear the band which plays there Sunday afternoons at four o’clock for an hour or two. Came home went over to see Belle and then wrote & read until time to retire. My home is very pleasant at this time of year and warm without fire– evenings are particularly fine, moon and clouds and thousands of stars, the mountain view and the feeling indescribable that one has in gazing upon nature’s beauties, with the peculiar temperament I have. {p. 280}

9 September 1895 • Monday

A very pleasant day and have tried to pick up threads dropped while away, there are so many things to do one cannot always make up lost time, I try to read up on political matters and inform myself so that I will not be at a loss when conversing with those who are up in everything, and not appear ridiculous– almost every evening I have to speak somewhere and being the Chairman of the Woman’s Republican League something bright is expected of me on all occasions, tonight I am to speak again and really I have had no time to reflect I must therefore say what comes uppermost in my mind. {p. 281}

10 September 1895 • Tuesday

This is my darling Emmie [Emma Whitney Wells]’s birthday Anniversary, she would have been 42. if she had lived today, such a long time since her departure, one could scarcely credit it to be seventeen years. I feel how desolate my home has been ever since she left us. I tried to go to the graveyard but could not, it is fitting to meditate over the graves of those so fondly loved in life, and in no other way can we seem to bring them near us. The day is charming and yet one cannot chase away the melancholy that clings to the memories of absent dear and precious ones. Would that we knew their wishes and their hopes and all that they think of those they’ve left upon the earth. {p. 282}

12 September 1895 • Thursday

Aunt Zina & myself went to Grantsville to the Sisters Conference. Going over in a buggy after leaving the train we had a terrible wind storm and the driver entertained us with accounts of serious mishaps of recent occurrence on the road, however we arrived safely went to the meeting house direct and Conference opened– Both Sister Zina and myself spoke forenoon and afternoon, had a numerous attendance and good spirit and fine singing, we had dinner with the Hales [Aroet L. and Louisa Cook Hale] and talked much of old times. In the evening we had the Y.L.M.I.A. Conference and I did most of the speaking Aunt Zina was very weary. We slept at Sister Hunter’s and had a pleasant evening {p. 284}

13 September 1895 • Friday

and in the morning we had Primary Conference which was most interesting After dinner we came to the train with a fine team and on the way home a storm came up but we reached home safely middle of the afternoon and found it had rained very hard during our absence. Matters are progressing finely with the Republican party– we are sure to succeed in carrying the election, though the Democrats are as positive as we are. A sort of dissatisfaction has arisen in the Territory against statehood by a few dissatisfied people who seem trying to work up an antagonism that is unpleasant, but my opinion is it will die out in time if let alone {p. 285}

23 September 1895 • Monday

Mrs. Fox & myself went to Murray South Cotton Wood ward and spoke at the Republican meeting– also Messrs. Dahlquist, Ferguson Booth & Ritchie.6{p. 295}

30 September 1895 • Monday

Today <morrow> is an anniversary of great moment to me Mell’s marriage to Wm. Dunford in 1867. at 17 years of age– we were happy then comparatively but what sorrow it brought us. He is dead– alas, and two beautiful girls7 from that marriage are now grown to womanhood. How can we account for the vicissitudes of life. I have been working hard the mailing is finished came home and dressed for the meeting in Farmer’s Ward where I was to speak– posters have been put up and cards printed & distributed and it is to be quite an event Mr. [Septimus Wagstaff] Sears will preside as he is President of the Club in the Ward {p. 302}

Footnotes

  1. [1] text: Here EBW used an L-shaped mark that was perhaps intended to indicate the start of a new paragraph or a new line.

  2. [2]Utah Woman’s Press Club.

  3. [3]“Heber Wells Will Speak,” Salt Lake Tribune, 1 Sept. 1895, 8.

  4. [4]Harriet Ensign Smith. (1900 U.S. Census, Logan, Utah, 244B; Smith, Death Certificate, 15 Mar. 1930.)

  5. [5]EBW, “A Tribute of Love,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 June 1899, 28:5.

  6. [6]“The Republican rally held last evening in the South Cottonwood meetinghouse was very successful in point of attendance and attention. Barlow Ferguson, E. [Elmer] E. Ritchie, Alex Dalquist, H. [Hiram] E. Booth, Mrs. Emmeline B. Wells and Mrs. Ruth M. Fox all delivered addresses full of sound Republicanism that awoke a responsive chord in those present.” (“South Cottonwood Rally,” Salt Lake Tribune, 24 Sept. 1895, 5.)

  7. [7]Daisie Dunford Allen and Verona Dunford Hillard. (1870 U.S. Census, Salt Lake City, 675[A]; Allen and Woods, marriage record, 12 Dec. 1892; Hill[a]rd and Woods, marriage record, 30 Apr. 1889.)