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February 1895


1 February 1895 • Friday

<weather rainy and dark> Some new delegates arrived all anxious to come to the front– Miss Frances of Ohio a newspaper woman very pretty and attracted much attention. Mrs. [Rachel Foster] Avery came down from Philadelphia. There is much business to be done and women who have executive ability are very prominent as money is essential in carrying forward any important work– My report came in this afternoon but I could not do it I was so exhausted with the work in Committee– when the Convention was closing Miss Anthony announced an invitation from Mrs. [Emma Luckie] Hemphill to an a reception at her home on Peach tree St. and I had an appointment with Mrs. Cobb– but she consented to go with me to the Reception– {p. 61}

2 February 1895 • Saturday

<Rec’d telegram this morning baby boy1 born to Annie last night–> This is quite an eventful day for me, as I am to speak. Went into Committee on Plan of Work at 9. A.M. and did not finish until about one o’clock. This is the most important Committee of the session. Went to Opera House in time heard Plan of work read by Mrs. Catt– and all the Comments.

I had ten minutes to report Utah and Miss Anthony came forward put her arms around me and made such an eloquent appeal that some of the ladies were moved to tears, it was a tribute of personal affection as well as a flattering compliment to the Territory.2 The officers of the Association were voted upon & elected Miss Anthony Pres. Mrs. Avery Cor. Sec. & Mrs. Catt National Organizer added to the Business Committee {p. 62}

3 February 1895 • Sunday

The whole morning was spent in consultation in Mrs. [Louisa M.] Southworth’s room discussing how to save Wemoudaughsis–3 and in writing letters home– went out to Meeting at Opera House where Anna Shaw is to speak & saw Mr. Gilmore of Utah who had come to inquire for me having seen my name in the papers. He walked down with me– I got a seat on the platform at last– and saw Mr. Cobb and his brother –the house was packed & hundreds outside who could not get in at all– The ladies took up a collection and made a little scene– in the evening some ladies spoke at different places in the City– I was asked to speak at Bethel Church but refused after accepting when I learned it was a colored people’s church as the Southern people consider it unwise–4 {p. 63}

4 February 1895 • Monday

<Reception tonight grand affair Gov. [William Y. Atkinson] & wife5 & distinguished guests.> This morning at 10 we met in Executive session in the Committee Room of the Aragon meeting lasted until some time after one o’clock I felt uneasy as I had promised to dine at Mrs. T. R. R. Cobb’s6 at 1/2 past one– saw Miss Anthony who was very affectionate and promised to have my speech first in the afternoon but I could not consent to that– I dressed in my black silk velvet and took a cab so as to be as near on time as possible and went to 401. Spring St. Mr. Cobb came to the door and was most hospitable in welcoming me to his home– I was introduced to his two brothers and to Mr. & Mrs. Weldon– he is one of the editors of the Atlanta Constitution the most influential state paper of Georgia. I had an enjoyable time & talked Utah & Mormonism. {p. 64}

5 February 1895 • Tuesday

<Mass Meeting in the Court House– pleasant day> Went to the Constitution Building to a Meeting of the Board of Lady Managers of the State for the coming Exposition Mrs. Avery <of Philadelphia> was speaking Mrs. Cantrull [Carrie Payne Cantrill] of Kent◊◊◊ [Kentucky] and then I spoke a short time– I went to Mrs. Catt’s room to say Good bye and she begged me to go on her train to night she will speak at Manassas [Virginia]. I would have gone had I been alone but I must consider my colleagues– in the afternoon went with the three Clay sisters7 to Decatur on the street car to see the City and the scenery round about, saw the Agnes Scott Seminary for girls built by a Mr. [George Washington] Scott as a Memorial to his mother. In the evening wrote letters home to Mell [Melvina Whitney Woods] & others– {p. 65}

6 February 1895 • Wednesday

This morning went out to buy ticket for us to go on to Washington D.C. Went up on Whitehall St. after where all the fine stores are– left Aragon at half past eleven & boarded train 12. [p.]m. Pullman Currahee. Sisters Daniels & Rogers in the berth opposite me. I had lunch & dinner on board for which I paid 2.00 one dollar each but I must say I enjoyed it very much. We were the only ladies in the car at first but one came on after a while– the country was pleasantly diversified and we passed from Georgia to North Carolina & South which should be mentioned first and then to Virginia and some fine towns & large cotton factories & all so new & picturesque {p. 66}

7 February 1895 • Thursday

<heavy snow storm wind high in Washington–> This morning after a night of unrest we arrived in Washington at the Baltimore and Potomac depot where [U. S. President James A.] Garfield was shot at 6.35– such an unearthly hour and took street cars after having our luggage transferred to the places we were to be entertained. The morning was severely cold, we had a storm nearly all the way up– & one could scarcely face the cold weather– I found the [Samuel K.] Hall’s and they welcomed me very cordially and after some warm drink and breakfast over we went down town Mrs. [Massie Dickson] Hall & myself–first to Wimoudaughsis and then to [illegible] Telegraph office, <sent dispatch home> then to see Sisters Daniels & Rogers & then home again– John Q. answered telegrams {p. 67}

8 February 1895 • Friday

<wind high extreme cold weather in Washington> Today is little Emmeline Cannon’s birthday– two years old. I must try to send a telegram and to buy her something suitable for a gift. The wind blows terribly and has all night long– windows rattle fearfully. shall not venture out unless the weather changes. All morning talked of Utah and the spirituilists with Mr. Hall. Letter from Dot this morning gave Mrs. Hall my photograph Spent the day in talking & doing a little filling in of my diary– wish I knew how all were at home. The new baby will be blest on the birthday of the last one possibly. The evening we spent in talking and going over the family affairs– and retired early to read and consider how to best manage the matters in hand. The wind has been so terrific I could not send the telegram {p. 68}

9 February 1895 • Saturday

The wind still blows no letter from home today only one from Mrs. Avery giving me the Constitution of the National Council & By Laws– I have been writing all day to the sisters at home It seems so strange that none of them write to me and especially Aunt Zina– I do feel that I must know more about the papers that are coming down than I do now. Dr. Arthur Hall came to see me today we had a conversation about Utah and the conditions there. In the evening we talked seriously of the people and the mission upon which I had come. I do wish Aunt Zina was here with me I feel as if it would be so much better for all of us {p. 69}

10 February 1895 • Sunday

This would have been Grace Groo’s birthday– she would have been 29. years old I believe– Mary must be lonely now, only Roscoe [W. Groo] and Mr. Groo gone forever. I had a letter from Daisie [Dunford Allen] today she is very happy seemingly. Blanche Hall who is at the Hospital training for a nurse came home today, she was very chatty and buoyant in spirits and it was very pleasant to see her and hear her. She told me much of her work and future hopes I wrote several letters and then went out to see the sisters who came with me– they were cold and sort of low-spirited and I could not encourage them very much. Mrs. Hall and I had an evening to ourselves– {p. 70}

11 February 1895 • Monday

Stayed in writing all the morning and went in the afternoon to the Wimodaughsis– saw Mrs. Avery was introduced to Mrs. Bradley of this City I think– dined down town– spent the evening in writing– I begin to be so anxious about the sisters who are coming– I had a letter from Sister [Elmina Shepard] Taylor today she has not seen either Aunt Zina or any one else apparently for some days– will leave Salt Lake with Sister [Sarah Ephramina (Minnie or Mima) Jensen] Snow on the 9th, which is already past now– I do hope I shall know when they are coming so they will not feel so dreary & weary as I did. {p. 71}

12 February 1895 • Tuesday

This morning had a letter from Sister [Sarah Granger] Kimball telling me of Keetie [Lucretia Heywood Kimball]’s baby’s8 death– nine months old– Frank [Kimball] is very much cut up over it. I am indeed sorry for them. I was very pleased with her letter– and shall try to answer it certainly– I thought perhaps the sisters would come today but as I have not heard of them I guess they are delayed or may be did not start so soon as they expected. I went twice to the B. & P. depot. have been trying to write a resume of my speech for the Council– so much ground to go over– how I long for home tonight I do hope Aunt Zina will come very soon– I long to see her. {p. 72}

13 February 1895 • Wednesday

Engaged type-writer today and gave her my report for Utah to the W.S.A. Convention feel much exercised about my work here and at home– Had a letter from Hebe [Heber M. Wells] today and draft for twenty five dollars– he told me Dr. [Ellis Reynolds] Shipp was coming to the Convention– I went out to look for rooms and to the Ebbitt House and examined the upper stories, the weather has moderated. Belva [Bennett] Lockwood called on me today with two of my her nieces. I had gone out & did not see her In the evening Mr. & Mrs. Hall went down to the Unity Club–9 and saw Mrs. Vorhees who was Dora Darmoor10 and I was alone all the evening and wrote a long letter to Anmie [Annie]– I must rise early & go to meet the sisters– {p. 73}

14 February 1895 • Thursday

I rose at six in the morning and had a cup of tea then went to the train and had to wait until 9 o’clock before they came– then we had breakfast in the depot restaurant and Minnie [Snow] and myself went to Belva Lo[c]kwood’s and looked at some rooms– the decision was to take them and Sister Taylor and Minnie came with me– to Mrs. Hall’s– we went to the Wimodaughsis and saw Mrs. Avery and the girls, met Mrs. [Elizabeth Sampson] Hoyt wife of Ex. Governor [John Wesley] Hoyt of Wyoming we had a pleasant time & then went to dine in 12th. St. Afterwards to Belva Lokwood’s and saw Mrs. Shipp & Susa [Young Gates] and then back to the house. I have my heart very full of grief tonight– {p. 74}

15 February 1895 • Friday

<Miss Anthony is 75 today> All day <morning> sisters have been at the Capital and I have been at home trying to accomplish something in the way of writing my article. I went out and had dinner at a restaurant <one. o’clock> on Pennsylvania Avenue Later in the day we went to Wemoudaughsis and saw Mrs. Avery and the Secretaries’ Mrs. At five o’clock we were at the Ebbitt House to help celebrate Miss Anthonys birthday, Met Mrs. Gray of California who was born in New Salem. A very sweet lady. I sat next but one at Miss Anthonys right hand, only the Rev. Anna Shaw between– I was invited to speak and did for a few minutes Mrs. [May Wright] Sewall arrived while we were at dinner. {p. 75}

16 February 1895 • Saturday

Today the Utah ladies went out again except Dr. Shipp and myself she came over and read her article to me. I urged her to cut it down Susa came later on and read hers. I am determined to go to the Ebbitt House on Monday morning. I have been once to look at rooms and Mrs. Taylor and myself looked at some yesterday. Mima [Snow] read me her article in the evening she is rather sentimental, and has taken decided pains to have it perfect. It really is quite complete in itself. The night is close and so many in one room is very trying still we like to be together. {p. 76}

17 February 1895 • Sunday

Last evening was our first business session at the Ebbitt House in the Red Parlor– we had an opportunity to speak on our own account. Miss Anthony had her feelings terribly hurt by the announcement that Sacrament was to be administered next day– & she being a Quaker felt much annoyed. I did feel very sorry for her but of course one woman cannot over rule the majority The sermon today was by Annis Ford Eastman (Elmira N.Y. and was from II Peter. 5.6.7. Union Communion Service but we came away– all of us– Miss Anthony & her friends {p. 77}

18 February 1895 • Monday

This morning our trunks went to the Ebbit house I had Room 629. upper floor the Council opened at 10. we were in our places. Mrs. Sewall is a very fine presiding officer and does do her work in the best style. She finished the introductions which took a long time and then read her speech which took in everything possible The afternoon was devoted to a Reception in the Parlors of the Ebbitt House where we met many noted people, and I renewed some acquaintances formed the first time I went to Washington. Evening Session was Religion and was presided over by Mary A. Don’s of Rhode Island– a very pleasing woman. Mary Lowe Dickinson was one of the speakers– {p. 78}

19 February 1895 • Tuesday

This morning was rainy and the Resolution Committee was the first thing– we had one meeting before or tried to have– It is going to be very difficult work very indeed Morning session, the first paper by Minnie D. [Dessau] Louis New York City followed by Discussion then two other papers. & discussion Afternoon session Religion and Temperance some very able women Mrs. [Hannah Greenebaum] Solomon from the Jewish Council– {p. 79}

28 February 1895 • Thursday

Today is my birthday or the nearest to it and the sisters from home have given me a very large and splendid bouquet of flowers fragrant with sweetness and withal a token of love and of appreciation which is far more precious than the gift itself. {p. 88}

Footnotes

  1. [1]Cavendish Wells Cannon. (1900 U.S. Census, Farmers Precinct, Salt Lake Co., Utah, 191A.)

  2. [2]“The Atlanta evening Journal in its Saturday night issue had this to say, which was commendatory of the remarks made of the work in Utah. [‘]When Mrs. Wells had concluded, President Anthony came forward and putting her arm around her gave her endorsement to the speaker. As she told of the work being done in Utah she kept her arms around the delegate and the audience was visibly affected at this exhibition of affection.’” (“Convention in Atlanta,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 and 15 Feb. 1895, 23:237.)

  3. [3]The Wimodaughsis Club was founded by attorney Emma Millinda Gillett (1852–1927) in Washington, DC, in 1890, with the purpose of supporting education for young working women. The name incorporates the words “Wives, Mothers, Daughters, and Sisters.” (Dorothy Thomas, “Gillett, Emma Millinda,” in James et al., Notable American Women, 2:36–37). EBW also visited the Wimodaughsis headquarters in Washington, DC. (EBW, Diary, 23 Feb. 1891.)

  4. [4]One of the other delegates, Clara Bewick Colby, “preached to more than a thousand people at the Bethel (colored) Church” that Sunday. (Anthony and Harper, History of Woman Suffrage, 4:247.)

  5. [5]Susan Milton Atkinson (1858–1942). (“Susan Cobb Milton Atkinson,” Find A Grave, accessed 19 Sept. 2019, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/49056189/susan-cobb-atkinson.)

  6. [6]Marion McHenry Lumpkin (1822–1897) was the widow of Thomas R. R. Cobb (1823–1862). (Cobb and Lumpkin, marriage record, 8 Jan. 1844; “Gen Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb,” Find A Grave, accessed 30 Apr. 2020, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8963/thomas-reade_rootes-cobb; Sylvanus Morris, “Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb,” in Lewis, Great American Lawyers, 7:311–320.)

  7. [7]Mary, Sarah (Sallie), Laura, and Annie Clay were active in the women’s rights movement for the South. (Stanton et al., History of Woman Suffrage, 3:818–822; Fuller, Laura Clay, 21–50, 60–61.)

  8. [8]Lawrence Kimball. (Kimball, Death Record, 6 Feb. 1895.)

  9. [9]“By way of social and intellectual development there have been established various clubs and societies, not all of which have survived. One of the first of these was the Unity Club, organized in the First Church, but for many years dissociated from the Unitarian Church.” (Scudder, “Historical Sketch,” Records of the Columbia Historical Society, 13:181.)

  10. [10]Dora Darmoore, a California editor and journalist, visited Salt Lake City in 1874. Lula Greene Richards, then the editor of Woman’s Exponent, told Exponent readers about Darmoore’s paper the Homestead in “Literary Notice,” Woman’s Exponent, 15 Aug. 1874, 3:45, and published Darmoore’s article “Ocean to Ocean,” in Woman’s Exponent, 15 Oct. 1874, 3:73. Darmoore and her husband, A. J. Boyer, visited EBW in 1881. (EBW, Diary, 26, 27, and 30 May 1881; “Home Affairs,” Woman’s Exponent 1 June 1881, 10:4.) At the Columbian Exposition, EBW saw “Dora Dartmoor, formerly Mrs. Boyer.” (EBW, Dairy, 25 May 1893.)