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September 1894


1 September 1894 • Saturday

This is a gloomy day and I am so full of sober reflections it seems such a sad thing to bury your only son [Eugene H. Harris] as I did so young, so inexperieneced, and it is now fifty years. this very day– no one can imagine my condition of mind. I cannot express it myself– it is out of the question. I recall in detail what transpired on that day. Away from all who loved me– save one my husband, among strangers though they were Latter day Saints, The agony, the suspense, the loss of consciousness, the trust I had in God was my strongest support. Such a heavy rain came on and lasted for hours Belle was out in it had been calling. Annie came up & Margaret, said John Q. had gone off fishing with a party, I went home with her and stayed all night– [p. 244] {p. 124}

2 September 1894 • Sunday

This morning lingered at Annie’s with the children and herself until noon– went home and dressed for the Tabernacle, Annie Louise and Margaret all went with me. It is the Stake Conference Brigham Young [Jr.] and President W. Woodruff occupied the time; the sacrament was administered. I went home with Annie and had dinner, then back to the office and Elise [Gasser] came and helped me awhile– I did not feel very well, and we came home early– Dot came over and slept with me– I was only reading magazines etc. did not feel able to even write a letter. I had written to Emma [Barrows] Brown of Charleston in reference to the sisters visit to Heber City– [p. 245] {p. 125}

3 September 1894 • Monday

I went to the office though this is a National Holiday. I finished some copy and had some callers– then about eleven Mrs. [Elizabeth Francis] Yates of Scipio came as per appointment– I talked to her of the Stake over which she presides and the work of the sisters there. At 2. p.m. the Reaper’s Club met after the summer vacation– Mrs. [Phoebe Young] Beatie and Mrs. [Eliza Slade] Bennion gave papers & considerable business was transacted– I have a letter from Mrs. Eames of San Francisco Mrs. [Ellen M.] Richardson of Boston lately and several other rather important ones– I went up to the Cemetery and looked after the graves of our dear ones. the trees in Mell’s lot have grown surprisingly this summer– [p. 246] {p. 126}

4 September 1894 • Tuesday

This morning was clear and cool and very pleasant– delightful air, and I had hoped to have an opportunity to do some private work but, ladies calling right away kept me engaged. Lucy [Rice] Clark from Farmington on Suffrage work and Sister [Elmina Shepard] Taylor about going to Uintah and so on. A letter from Mell was quite satisfactory and one from Sister Bullock of Springville about County work. Kate & Annie both came in and Dr. Shipp[.] I read all my proofs and finished editorials. I went up to Mrs. [Bertha] Bamberger’s and took the two volumes of Marcella– she was very pleased to see me, and we had a pleasant talk, one boy goes back to Yale and the other to Poughkeepsie to prepare for college.1 The dreadful fires in Minn. are too horrible to read or to think of. Death and destruction seem to be stalking abroad. [p. 247] {p. 127}

5 September 1894 • Wednesday

This morning was fine and as it was Utah’s Militia Day it seemed propitious– I had a Committee Meeting of the Reaper’s Club in the forenoon and some callers, and we prepared part of the program– in the afternoon I went to the Court House and paid my first taxes– I felt very much like protesting against Taxation without Representation but in view of so soon having Statehood and perhaps Woman Suffrage I am willing to bide the time. My taxes had always been paid by my husband previously though the house was mine– I called on Sister [Maria Richards] Wilcox & Sister [Ella Wilcox] Hyde her daughter– I have been writing notes etc. and this evening have read my proofs for the paper Dot is sleeping here tonight [p. 248] {p. 128}

6 September 1894 • Thursday

This morning was rainy after a terrific night of wind, such as one seldom experiences, & had I been alone would have made me very melancholy, as it was I had Dot to speak to– but it was almost unbearable, it made me so nervous. The house shook and the drums of the chimneys sung and whistled tremendously, and the wildness was in itself grand had one not quaked with fear– Sister Stevenson and Aunt Zina have been in though the down pour was almost unprecedented. I was obliged to go out Belle went to Fast meeting and had Brenton’s baptism recorded in Farmer’s Ward. I have sent off fourteen letters today and have been very busy in other ways. Had the paper made up– and did some errands up town for Belle– [p. 249] {p. 129}

7 September 1894 • Friday

This is Aunt Presendia [Huntington Kimball]’s birthday, she would have been 84 today– it has rained all day long continuously, and I have kept in doors making out bills and writing letters to people, of the work in hand. Such a weary day and no one came except to tell me their troubles. Well it is something to have the confidence of the sisters and to feel they can come for sympathy. I waited late for the team from Vernal but the Br. did not come, and at last I started home in the pouring rain, at Sherman Ave. I met John Q. & Annie waiting for a car to go to the theater and they asked me to go there and stay with the children, so I went on to Belle’s had supper and went back to Annie’s and stayed all night– [p. 250] {p. 130}

8 September 1894 • Saturday

This morning it was clear and bright I rose late & went off after breakfast. The paper is out and as it is Saturday of course I am unusually busy, and trying to get ready to go away. I saw Ida [Snow] Gibbs on the street she has been abroad for a long time– Sisters Zina & Amelia Young, Stevenson, Freeze,2 Stule, [Leah Neibaur] Paul, & daughter3 [Lydia Dunford] Alder, Snow, [Mary McKay] Mair, Cannon and others have been in Kate [Katherine Howard] Brockbank had a tale of woe, [Julia Ann Morris] Golightly, Williams, and ever so many more, Elise came up in the evening and helped me. So the time goes. I came home late to my own house and here I am writing and meditating. I wrote to Mrs. Lillian M. Stevens4 today about our finances in the Council. Also to Several Sisters and did all I could in the way of copy [p. 251] {p. 131}

Footnotes

  1. [1]Ernest Bamberger and Joseph Bamberger.

  2. [2]Probably Mary Ann Burnham Freeze.

  3. [3]E. Robena Paul.

  4. [4]Lillian M. Ames Stevens was a national reformer who served as treasurer of the National Council of Women between 1891 and 1895. She later served many years as president of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.