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September 1892


1 September 1892 • Thursday

We arrived in good time. Barry was with us. Verona was waiting and the dinner was ready baby Hillard was well and healthy & handsome. Today is 48 years since my son Eugene [H. Harris] was born, how strange it seems now to look back upon, and I can scarcely realize that it was all quite true. Last night we had a pleasant time Will and Mell went to Mrs. Frank Johnson’s to sleep and I Slept here with Daisy. Today we have been visiting <with each other> and some ladies have called Mrs. Johnson & Mrs. Greerson and her mother. At evening Mell & I went down to the meeting called to organize a Columbian Club– Mell made quite a fine speech, Daisie was taken sick with cholera morbus.[p. 245] {p. 270}

2 September 1892 • Friday

This morning Daisie was very bad indeed, I had to get up and help wait upon her, Verona too did all in her power, we did not send for her mother but worked on ourselves as best we could– she began to get easier in the afternoon but the folks could not go home as they had intended. Daisie kept in bed all day Miss [Francis] Geeson came up towards evening and stayed a little while with her– finally she felt so much better we all went to bed and slept. No news from home but very distressing suspense and such forebodings, but I am not surprised for my heart has been torn with conflicting emotions so long it is wonderful if I can ever rise above it. [p. 246] {p. 271}

3 September 1892 • Saturday

This morning Daisie felt better and the arrangements are all made for the journey to Wallace by private conveyance. start about 11 A.M. Miss Geeson will go with them. In the afternoon we all Verona baby and I went to Mrs. Frank Johnson’s to tea. She had invited us the Thursday and hoped to have Mell & Daisie I wore my pongee silk and Mell her blue cashmere and white muslin waist, baby dressed up fine, Mrs. Johnson Sen. formerly of Denver, Mrs. Swain, Mrs. Judge Pyper Mrs. Dutton & Mrs. Dutton Sen. of Minneapolis and a Mrs. Johnson not related Mrs. Ingalls, eleven ladies in all and three babies. We had a fashionable tea and pleasant social gathering– [p. 247] {p. 272}

4 September 1892 • Sunday

Barry was busy Mr. Wiesner Miss Geeson’s sweetheart was here and Verona and myself went out for a walk I had written a letter to Mrs. J. M. Flowers of Chicago and read it to Verona down on the corduroy bridge by the road home and also the same that leads to Tiger Gulch where we believed the fairies dwelt if there ever were any. That night I wrote to Annie dear girl so bereft and I was not with her in the trouble. Mr. Wiesner dined with us and we had a nice evening. Baby was fine and all was pleasant– I tried to do a little writing but could not muster the courage– My heart is heavy some how and I mourn within [p. 248] {p. 273}

5 September 1892 • Monday

This morning we decided to take a walk up the gulch Verona and I and baby– We took baby & carriage & went up Cougar Gulch to some fine romantic places, left baby <asleep> and wandered on in search of berries and to hear the pines sigh– the wind was quite still and we waited but could not get the music I was so anxious for until we were on the way home, then it was more melodious– At lunch Barry told us that Mr. Crane one of the Commissioners for the County and his two boys would come to dine– So we decided not to go out calling, Mrs. Johnson Sen. however called on us. Mr. Crane came to dinner and his boys. I had a letter from Dr. Pratt & from the Cleopatra Girdle Co. [p. 249] {p. 274}

6 September 1892 • Tuesday

Last night I had a harrowing dream it seemed impossible to put it aside and yet I tried then after breakfast Verona and I went up the Gulch Gold Run where we had the pic nic party three years ago– such memories it called up, we heard the sighing pines, Verona read I sat and thought over many things– then we came home found there had been a telephone message from Mell and we went strait down town to see– my heart beat very violently– Mell would be back at 2 p.m. We came up had lunch and went back, Barry gave me 25.00 towards the steel engraving, After dinner letter from Annie telling me she was sad and lonely and then I took up the Examiner and read bad news of my boy– [p. 250] {p. 275}

7 September 1892 • Wednesday

Left Murray by Stage for Wallace, had no sleep scarcely, and was up in good time dressed and ready, bade Verona and baby Good Bye also Barry of course & drove away with the four horse team– mountain stage line– got into Wallace about 1/2 past eleven saw Will first, he paid my fare over. Capt. McCammon helped me out my lovely bouquet of fresh dewy roses were spoiled with the heat and dust and my heart was sad and forlorn, Mell had no news we sent off two telegrams one to Belle the other to John Q and waited all day but no reply came [p. 251] {p. 276}

8 September 1892 • Thursday

scarcely moved about all next day, this day brought us news of [John Greenleaf] Whittier’s death1 which transpired yesterday– such a great man and the last of the trio Whittier, Bryant & Long-<fellow> Lieut Bradley & Lindsey called at the house In the evening went over to Mrs. Sivers with Mell & Daisie met Capt. Bubb and wife also his daughter Lieut Layton & Lindsey & Bradley the last named knew Brie Wells slightly as we had been there one year after the olt Brie came in as a freshman [p. 252] {p. 277}

9 September 1892 • Friday

<Telegram from John Q.> Friday morning made some preparations etc in the afternoon Mell & I paid some calls– to Mrs. Hussey Mrs. Trask Mrs. Porter Mrs. Campbell & Mrs. Long– in the evening Mr. and Mrs. Trask came and spent some time with us very agreeably he told us a great deal of his living near Longfellow when a boy and his pride in the courtesy of showing people in etc. [p. 253] {p. 278}

10 September 1892 • Saturday

Went to the Gem mine took the Northern Pacific train 8.40 A.M. Harry was going up to pay the men and Mrs. Trask went with us, Mell, Daisie Mrs. Trask and myself– went up the trammy in the boxcar in which they slide the car down, it is rather a dangerous venture then we put on overcoats, the three had rubber ones and I had Capt. Bubbs military overcoat brass buttons and all and candles [p. 254] {p. 279} <etc– and went through the mine>

11 September 1892 • Sunday

Col. <Wm.> Hammill came to dinner & Harry afterwards Mr. Mann called we all went to the Sisters Hospital and went thro’ it saw Mrs. Capt. Brown whose husband is dangerously ill with pneumoniea. The Sisters are Sisters of Charity daughters of St. Vincent and are well established there, have accommodations for 90 patients but at present have only 12 in the house. This is our last evening together and we wanted to make the most of it, Mell put on her elegant silk dress; [p. 255] {p. 280} <it is very beautiful indeed–>

12 September 1892 • Monday

wea. Fair

Monday came away bade Mell good bye very sad parting, not knowing what might transpire while separated Col. Hammell & Harry Allen were both on the train Daisie was with me going to Spokane, the smoke from forest fires is something terrible– Moon and sun always bright red, arrived at Spokane Mr. [Eugene] Klein met us at the depot and we had a nice supper and pleasant evening [p. 256] {p. 281}

13 September 1892 • Tuesday

wea. fair

<Left Spokane at 7–>

Pullman Ormus, enroute to Pendleton, Oregon on the way home Daisie & Mrs. Klein came to depot with me. have been writing my story trying to occupy my mind while the train moves on towards home. I cannot sleep, my soul is too much wrought upon and so distraught, We stopped at Starbuck [Washington] to dinner and I went into get some relief from the change. twice today we have had a hot-box to hinder our making time. got into Pendleton 7. p.m. Went to hotel had a good room, sat up copying manuscript until after midnight, slept very little [p. 257] {p. 282}

14 September 1892 • Wednesday

Left Pendleton before 6. A.M. could not get Pullman or a seat in Chair Car. after breakfast in the dining car through colored waiter succeeded in reaching Pullman conductor who took me into the Pullman met Mrs. Love of Nebraska and child Lola– going to stop at Salt Lake– Sent a dispatch from Huntington Oregon to John Q. terrible hot on the car almost unbearable. Met two young women daughters of the Episcopal clergyman at Ellsworth Kansas. We had some pleasant conversation and became quite free with each other. [p. 258] {p. 283}

15 September 1892 • Thursday

This morning we reached Ogden John Q. and Annie at depot. It seemed very sad to come home and find one of the dear ones gone. Sweet little Eleanor so bright and promising when we went away, now laid in the cold grave, though her pure spirit has gone to the celestial shores where there is no more pain. Came home late in the afternoon found all in good order here; Dot had been quite energetic; and <I> soon saw Belle and the children. My work has of course run behind only correspondence attended to [p. 259] {p. 284}

23 September 1892 • Friday

This is the Conference of the Relief Society of this Stake of Zion and I went to meeting and spoke in the forenoon in the afternoon I gave out a notice and spoke of the flower symbol for Utah. Had a pretty good audience in the afternoon, rather thin in the morning. Had a letter from Mell today also one for Annie which I sent. Felt alarmed about John Q. and went over to Abram heard by telegram that he was about the same but would be down tomorrow went to the lecture of Edmund Russell took Emmie Sears and Sister Howard. He gave us Home decoration and harmony of color– Sister Clawson and Howard sat on either side of me– I enjoyed it very much full of good suggestions [p. 260] {p. 285}

24 September 1892 • Saturday

<Letter today from Alice Carey Waterman San Francisco–> This morning went out on errands, deposited the money given me by Will and Barry towards the steel engraving. John Q. came down this morning feeling a little better but looking very badly indeed. Annie and the little folks all well. President Geo. Q. Cannon left in great haste for Washington D.C. on account of the Report of the Utah Commission–2 God speed him on his journey! Phebe Beattie sent for me to come to a Suffrage meeting, and Sister Clawson wanted me to go to South Cotton Wood to a Conference, but I refused all expecting to call on Mrs. Salisbury with Edmund Russell but he forgot his appointment and so I was left out. Sent notices to all the papers about World’s Fair meeting– [p. 268] {p. 286}

25 September 1892 • Sunday

Slept late and went to Belle’s to dinner– then to the Tabernacle– Eddie [Edward T.] Taylor was preaching, and after him Ort Whitney our Bishop spoke upon the vision or dream of Nebuchednezzar– and Daniel’s interpretation, the anthem sung by the choir was “By Babylon’s Waves.” [p. 269] {p. 287}

26 September 1892 • Monday

This is kind of an ordeal for me– went early to see if the Hall (Social) would be ready Clara Cannon & Lillie Freeze were here early on Primary business, and I hurried as much as possible and was on time at the meeting– Mrs. Salisbury & Mrs. [Alice Doyle] Whalen were both present also Miss [Margaret] Keogh and Miss [Emma] Mc’Cornick and Mrs. [Mary C.] Lyman & Mrs. [Inez Belden] Wallace– Mrs. F. S. Richards and Aunt Zina Sister Horne and Sister Kimball. We got through the business of the meeting pretty well and there was a fair attendance not many from the country, we appointed the next meeting on Thursday Sep. 29th [p. 270] {p. 288}

27 September 1892 • Tuesday

All day long fussing with this and that, it seems impossible to do very much Mrs. Salisbury’s note came early saying, she had been called away to Helena Mont. because of her brother’s3 illness– [p. 271] {p. 289}

28 September 1892 • Wednesday

John Q. did come down today and tell me that the folks would come tomorrow– it is a relief to know they are coming at last and I am so busy for it seems impossible to do everything and tonight we have the Press Club because Dr. Shipp is going away and we want to have her with us this time. Susa Y. Gates is here has been in to see me, and her mother also; she has told me more about Miss [Maud M.] Babcock and Harvard– Press Club meeting pretty good Miss [N. V.] Davis gave a fine sketch of Alaska and Gladys of England (written) Sister Fox came & Mrs. Dickinson & others twelve in all Susa did not come– we will try to have a meeting during Conference– [p. 272] {p. 290}

29 September 1892 • Thursday

<<lst> World’s Fair Meeting> S.L. Co. <at Templeton Cathie [Catherine C.] Culmer’s birthday 13 years <old>> All day long I was looking for Annie & the children but they did not arrive until about 7 o’clock p.m. then we had supper– I dressed to go up to Belle’s, she had some company, and Mr. Russell and Baron Rudolph Van Hallut an Austrian Baron came and called upon me– After they were gone I went up to Belle’s met Dr. Whitney and his mother and Mr. Hubbard and others– Ort & Budd, Zine, Mahle [Marian Beatie Whitney], Emma Pyper and stayed for some refreshments and brought some home to Annie, John Q. and Geo. Q. came about eleven and then we settled down for the night and I felt more satisfied– the goods are at the depot & the pony [p. 273] {p. 291}

30 September 1892 • Friday

Today has been windy and disagreeable– Annie went down to her house this morning and the children too, and she commenced getting things fixed. I went to Mr. Russell’s lecture in the afternoon and enjoyed it very very well, it rained considerably and after I came home I felt so uncomfortable about Annie and the children that I went down there and took some cakes & things and found the house locked up– the lightning and thunder were terrific and I became quite nervous and started back, there was no car, and I walked on alone in the blinding lightning– finally a car came along and I was relieved, came home found them all here. We had a terrible night with thunder lightning & rain [p. 274] {p. 292}

Footnotes

  1. [1]See EBW’s tribute and personal memories of the poet in “John Greenleaf Whittier,” Woman’s Exponent, 15 Sept. 1892, 21:45–46.

  2. [2]George Q. Cannon left for the East Coast and met with political advisers in Jersey City, New York City, and Boston. (Cannon, Journal, 23 Sept.–3 Oct. 1892.) EBW presumed that Cannon was responding to the mid-September 1892 report of the Utah Commission. Under the Edmunds Act of 1882, the U.S. government appointed a five-member commission to oversee elections in Utah and restrict men who were practicing polygamy from voting or holding office. The Edmunds-Tucker Act of 1887 went further, disenfranchising all women in the territory. (Firmage and Mangrum, Zion in the Courts, 231–233, 235–236.) Church leaders used political and legal means to counter these oppressive measures, including appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court and urging statehood for Utah. (Firmage and Mangrum, Zion in the Courts, 231–233; Bitton, George Q. Cannon, 335–336, 371–372.)

  3. [3]Probably James Blaine Walker.