The Church Historian's Press The Church Historian's Press

February 1892


1 February 1892 • Monday

Aunt Presendia Kimball died this morning and the Des. News have requested me to write the notice for the paper I have written quite an extended notice giving the most important events of her life as she had related them to me herself and I had published them in the Exponent– my own paper is nearly ready and I must make mention of the demise in that and write at more length later on– Aunt Zina is of course overcome with grief and everything depends upon her almost with all her family. She seems to be the leading spirit and to have carried the burden for the others. Weather very cold and stormy [p. 32] {p. 73}

2 February 1892 • Tuesday

All day helping with the preliminaries for the Suffrage gathering, so many in and out and so much going on– weather very trying cold and wet and the house is very cold and my stoves all out of order. The paper about ready now for the press. I am considering what ought to be done about the Exponent to help it along. Letters are being written to the several Stakes about the Jubilee and indeed it is time we made our preparations for many of our sisters are so far away from us in the old countries and the islands of the sea. It is an undertaking of some importance and much of the planning devolves upon me. [p. 33] {p. 74}

3 February 1892 • Wednesday

Funeral of Presendia in the Assembly Hall eleven o’clock. I was in time for once, though I have often been late– everything was very beautifully arranged all draping in white and the casket pure white and very elegant, flowers exquisite, many lilies, and a great deal of smilax– the speakers were very eulogistic, and the singing and all the services were impressive and satisfactory. Sister Presendia had often felt she was not appreciated in life but surely the respect shown on this occasion must have satisfied her if she was permitted to witness it and to hear. her son [George Buell] came from St. Jo, Missouri to attend. [p. 34] {p. 75}

4 February 1892 • Thursday

American Fork with Sister Howard– we arrived in time for morning meeting, and both spoke, had a large gathering and in the afternoon many more– I spoke a long time in the afternoon explaining in reference to the National Council of Women and also the Convention. In the evening we had a pleasant gathering at Sister [Jane Robinson] Hindleys and we stayed there all night. Sister [Mary Ann Stubbs] Hindley the eldest was quite ill with a severe cough and pain in her bones like the grippe. She is a very able woman & has presided there 24 years and at this anniversary was not able to come to meeting and preside.1 [p. 35] {p. 76}

5 February 1892 • Friday

We had a nice early breakfast and went to the depot in a sleigh very cold morning– Had a pleasant ride home and I found all well, Dot. here in the Office. This is the anniversary of Bishop [Newel K.] Whitney’s birthday, he would have been 99 years old had he lived– Trying to get on with the mailing and lots of hindrances, people writing about the Jubilee celebration wanting instruction etc. Meetings with the Central Board and Aunt Zina very much occupied with little Zina [Young Card] and the children. I am striving with all my might to find time for everything needful for me to do at home and for the public, perhaps I try to carry too much. [p. 36] {p. 77}

6 February 1892 • Saturday

Sister Howe’s party2 [p. 41] {p. 78}

14 February 1892 • Sunday

St. Valentines Day but mostly celebrated yesterday– last evening lots of parties and visits etc. It does seem to be a general time of festivity among our people both old and young. Too much levity for the seriousness of the times in which we live I am afraid of the tendency, upon the young more especially [p. 45] {p. 79}

15 February 1892 • Monday

Miss Susan B. Anthony’s 72nd birthday & celebrated in the 15th Ward Entertainment hall, with considerable ceremony a programme etc. the ladies wore yellow ribbons or roses or sunflowers I took Will [William H.] King President of the Council of the Utah Legislature. Emily Richards took Will [William H.] Seegmiller Speaker of the House etc. and also Mr. [William P.] Sargent member from Garfield County. I read an original article on “What Some Women Have Done”–3 the exercises were quite entertaining & so were the speeches and the supper was delicious– [p. 46] {p. 80}

16 February 1892 • Tuesday

At the 7th Ward meeting house annual meeting and supper in the Ladies Hall. Bishop [William] Thorne was present & spoke Sisters M. I. Horne & E. S. [Elmina Shepherd] Taylor and myself were the visitors. Sister M. A. [Mary Ann Jenkins] Lambert the President had charge and spoke encouragingly to the meeting. A party in the evening in honor of Sister Annie [Hill] Dinwoody her Counselor was part of the programme– there was also a party in the 14th Ward but I could not attend either of them– my work would not permit it– so went home to work again [p. 47] {p. 81}

17 February 1892 • Wednesday

Spent afternoon at Sister Howe’s, had a fine dinner as we always do, some of the invited guests were not able to come on account of sickness and other causes. Sister Howe is a charming hostess and makes herself most agreeable. Sister [Jane Cobleigh] Richardson was ill and could not come. There were however quite a number of old friends gathered and very pleasant it was with the bright coal fire in the grate and such handsome furnishings in the parlor. In style of living Sister Howe surpasses most of us and she knows how to prepare excellent dinners. But to me the conversation is of more consequence than the dinner [p. 48] {p. 82}

19 February 1892 • Friday

Clara [Horne] James had a visit this afternoon and I managed to get up there in pretty good time. Sister Zina & Sister Taylor were there Minnie [Permelia Horne] James and Em. [Emmaretta Whitney] Pyper and we washed and anointed Clara preparatory to her confinement, Mattie [Martha Horne] Tingey was there also and we also had Sister Bathsheba with us. had a very nice dinner and stayed quite late came down home in the tea cart, raining ever so hard. such a lonesome house, came in and changed my dress and went up to Belle’s to sleep as usual, they are generally all in bed when I get there and it disturbs them more or less but it is a sort of saving for me in many things especially coal & oil– [p. 50] {p. 83}

20 February 1892 • Saturday

Hurried with my writing and made calculations to go up to Annie’s as I wished to borrow her valise to go to the [Manti] Temple this <next> week. Finally after the greatest struggle got off on the afternoon train and arrived at Ogden went over to Annie’s in a carriage as I almost always have to nowadays for it is too far for me to undertake to walk– found them all tolerably well and Annie so glad I was going to try to go to the Temple: no one knows how anxious I am to do ever so little of my work there and also to have some communion in that sacred place with the sweet spirit that hovers over it– [p. 51] {p. 84}

21 February 1892 • Sunday

All day we have been visiting and trying to rest at least I have for my body is very weary and I have not anything to annoy me up here as I have at home, so many calls are made upon my time and patience that it is sometimes almost unbearable and I long to get away and take a breathing spell. Up here the children are so sweet and it sort of comforts me to come and rest. Sister Wallace is about the only one who comes in to Annie’s when I am there so that we have the time exclusively to ourselves. I generally lie in bed late and the day goes by swiftly and the evenings are pleasant [p. 52] {p. 85}

22 February 1892 • Monday

Washington’s birthday and it is being celebrated with parties and theatres. I came down on the morning train and set to work to get copy and all else ready for the week so as not to be too much upset in going away. Aunt Zina will let matters rest until I get back, she would like very much to go down with me but cannot very well just now. The weather is very unpleasant but I shall not stop for that. Belle is making all calculations on getting all the family together on my birthday and giving me a pleasant party It is very good of her to go to so much trouble for my happiness [p. 53] {p. 86}

23 February 1892 • Tuesday

Well today has been all hurry and confusion, and I had to just rustle and keep Dot going too to get things so I could go tomorrow Belle has helped me all she could and Dot will keep the office while I am away and I feel that everything will be all right and I intend to enjoy myself if it is at all possible. My head is all in awhirl but when I get away I think my wits will come back to me. The Legislature are fussing over the appropriation for the Worlds Fair & we are trying every way to get something done in the matter that will be creditable but cannot be at all sure as yet– [p. 54] {p. 87}

24 February 1892 • Wednesday

Left on the early train for Manti Temple and had a pleasant enough journey down– arrived cold and weary and saw Br. [Christian] Jessen rode up with him to the Temple Hotel, soon got a warm room– the very room where Pres. [Daniel H.] Wells had his office and bed etc. and where I stayed with him four nights when here for my last visit in his life time. The bed had been turned around and the door into the hall closed but I was glad to be here any way and it seemed more pleasant than to have gone up stairs or elsewhere– I settled myself and then went to Br. [Jens C. A.] Weibye’s to see Sister Minerva [White] Snow and had supper up there with her and spent a couple of hours [p. 55] {p. 88}

25 February 1892 • Thursday

Went to the Temple and when I learned that I could have baptisms I got some clothes from Sister Snow and got ready for it– went into the water and was baptized for my aunt Harriet Woodward Rand my father’s half sister and for several others and I fe[l]t blessed in doing this work. Dr. Ellis R. Shipp was there and was baptized for the renewal of her covenants and went through the house4 for one of my friends, and I went through for one of my relatives my grandmother5 and I felt very much blest too– we went over [to?] the Temple afterwards and up into President Wells room and in the little prayer room & had a nice time with Sister Snow and others of the sisters. [p. 56] {p. 89}

26 February 1892 • Friday

This morning went to the Temple again and went over with the same programme for another of my relatives. Sister [Rebecca Coolidge] Wareham took a name for me this time and so I accomplished a little more of my work for the dead Sister [Myra Clayton] Winters, Tim [Timothy J. Winter] and his wife [Agnes Cowan] were in the Temple & others whom I knew quite well and I enjoyed myself very much. Louis Anderson whom I had so much wished to see was very ill. I went with Sister Snow to see him. I did a little sealing one woman to Pres. Wells, and the same evening we had a meeting in the City hall or Council house at which I spoke for nearly an hour– [p. 57] {p. 90}

27 February 1892 • Saturday

Through the day I tried to make preparations for the evening. I came home from the Temple today & made every calculation possible for the Press meeting this evening. I was more than surprised when I found that there had been a plan laid to celebrate the birthday by the club. I had no intimation whatever until after the meeting was opened and some business begun then some one moved that the meeting adjourn and that we proceed to other affairs etc. And then I found poems, presents and refreshments had been brought and I received the greatest ovation of my whole life from the ladies present, and I was completely overwhelmed [p. 58] {p. 91}

28 February 1892 • Sunday

Went to the Tabernacle and enjoyed it very much, not particularly the speaking but the sacrament and the great respect of the previous evening seemed to crave a balance of some sort and I prayed sincerely for the spirit of the Lord to be with me & guide and protect me from evil and I tried to draw in the wanderings of my mind and center them upon divine subjects. In the evening I tried to get some letters written to my dear ones who were not near enough to participate in the birthday honors and enjoyments. Retired late and came down home in the morning to do some little work on the paper. [p. 59] {p. 92}

29 February 1892 • Monday

wea. pleasant

The day was fine, and sunshine bright & cheerful, many thoughts were aroused in looking backward over the dreary years. so much that might have been done better and so much left undone. The morning brought me sweet remembrances from friends, and very many of them, flowers in abundance for February and many other gifts Annie & the children came on the morning train, and brought their gifts. Annie & John Q. black lace dress. fancy articles from the grand-children, satchl and purse from Verona [Dunford Hillard] with name– two pieces of tulle from Daisie [Dean Dunford], Mell whole suit of under clothing, all our family nearly gave me something Sister [Elizabeth Harrison] Goddard silver card-tray & the party was a great success [p. 60] {p. 93} dinner in the afternoon and refreshments in the evening–

Footnotes

  1. [1]See “Editorial Notes,” Woman’s Exponent, 15 Feb. 1892, 20:117.

  2. [2]Julia Howe’s party was described in “Editorial Notes,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Mar. 1892, 20:124.

  3. [3]EBW’s article, a cultural review, was published in the Woman’s Exponent. (“What Some Women Have Done,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 June 1892, 20:173–174.)

  4. [4]Going “through the house” refers to moving from room to room in the Manti Temple for a series of instructions and covenants termed the “endowment.” (See EBW, Diary, 17 July 1891; 22 May 1900. For an explanation of the endowment, see EBW, Diary, 14 Sept. 1874, note.)

  5. [5]EBW’s paternal grandmother was Lucy Manson (1762–1791), who was born in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts, and married Elisha Woodward. Her maternal grandmother was Sarah Morgan (1773–about 1799), who was born in Brookfield, Worcester, Massachusetts, and married John Hare Jr. (Madsen, Intimate History, 503; Temple, History of North Brookfield, Massachusetts, 609.)