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June 1876


1 June 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. June. 1. We were mailing all day we had some callers and Mrs. Richards was taken quite sick in the office. Uncle Lorenizo1 took her home in the buggy. We were here alone in the evening.

2 June 1876 • Friday

Friday June 2d. Hattie Fuller is twenty four today how time flies. In the morning one of the editors of the Chicago Journal of Commerce called at the office, staid some time talking of Mormonism Polygamy etc.2 In the evening returning from the office I saw Mr. Leyson who introduced me to Mr. Joslyn. passed a few minutes in an animated conversation. Went to a concert in the 14th Ward by invitation took Sister Eliza. We walked home with her afterwards; one of the most beautiful moonlight nights, returned found Mr. Andrews and Mr. Ord here; they staid late and the time passed gaily. [p. 81]

3 June 1876 • Saturday

Sat. June 3d. All day long in the office business rather more lively. Another meeting of the committee for the Fair; had lots of callers in the office: saw Mr. Honore and Dr. Page this morning. Mailed a letter to Martha Wells: how troubled I do feel about the folks. came home found Em. had gone to the theatre with Ort, and Lou. with Jimmie, Julian here with Annie. Mr. Andrews called said he should leave town Monday morning.

4 June 1876 • Sunday

Sun. June 4th. We were all invited down to Mell’s to dinner in honor of Daisie’s birthday which will be tomorrow Leslie was very sick indeed. We passed a very pleasant day Belle came down with her children to give them an out. In the evening Mr. Andrews called to bid us goodbye. The Wasatch crowd were here most of them. I went up to the Post Office with Frank Kimball and we went and had ice-cream. Today I had a letter from Mrs. [Martha G.] Kimball3 which was very sorrowful in its tone and shows pretty plainly the unhappiness of Marriage in the world.

5 June 1876 • Monday

Mon. June 5th, Daisie is eight years old to day, I was busy in the office all day long no cessation whatever, had a great many callers. I bought a new hat; in the evening the girls had lots of young company around. I was very much fatigued.

6 June 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. June 6th. I had another busy day, was called upon by the Editor of the Sacramento Daily Leader. his wife and a young lady. [p. 82] He promised me his paper as an exchange. In the evening Mr. Hendrie came and spent the evening with us. Ort was here and Belle.

7 June 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. June 7. Annie received a package of pamphlets from Mr. Bowen of Chicago. I had a very unpleasant day with office work. Too many persons coming in to talk and bore one to death. One of my particular friends came to call on me and we had a very agreeable conversation. Em. went to the Wasatch.

8 June 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. June 8. A very pleasant day wind blew up in the afternoon furiously trees blew down and dust flew. Mr. <H. S.> Kimball called on me at the office in regard to his wife’s letter.

9 June 1876 • Friday

Friday June 9. A tedious disagreeable day went to see a young person who was in trouble:, she gave me her baby a boy five months old, I brought him home I do not know if I shall keep him or not. her name was Nellie Hendry her husbands name Reynolds the baby’s name Frank William, In the evening Em. went to rehearsal Mr. H. called he went with Mary Jane and m<e>yself to take Mrs. Groo home. A house full of boys.

10 June 1876 • Saturday

Sat. June 10. The work was very pressing, all day extremely busy. In the evening was in until after nine came home so tired, found Mr. Hendrie here with Annie, he spent the evening with us, we had a very pleasant time.

11 June 1876 • Sunday

Sun. June 11. Allday reading proofs and fussing with the new baby. Mr. Ord came in the afternoon, in the evening Frank Kimball, afterwards Mr. Honore Dr. Page and Col. Conlie a friend of theirs. [p. 83]

12 June 1876 • Monday

Mon. June 12. This is the last week of school, every thing is being hurried; no news yet from the Esq. we are all worried very much.

13 June 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. June 13. A very excessively warm day Mr. Ord was here in the evening.

14 June 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. June 14. The Wasatch met here had a pleasant session; a very large crowd. Went down town today with Helen [Mar Kimball] Whitney.

15 June 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. June 15. Working hard all day at the papers. no chance to rest whatever

16 June 1876 • Friday

Friday June 16. Examination; it passed of[f] satisfactorily to teachers and pupils. Annie & Louie both got chromos’ for being punctual every day Mr. Hendrie came and spent the evening.

17 June 1876 • Saturday

Sat. June 17. We finished mailing went to Mell’s to dinner, had a very nice time; in the evening Em. was sick, and all day on Sunday. Belle and all her children were here: Mon. June 18. This afternoon we had a telegram saying the Esquire had crossed the river safely.4

18 June 1876 • Sunday

Sun. June 18. Em. was so ill all day that I never had a moments rest. Annie went up to Jeanette Sharp’s Belle and the children were here and spent the day. In the evening George A. [Richards] and some of the boys were here.

19 June 1876 • Monday

Mon. June 19. An extremely hot sultry day and no signs of anything different, terrible dusty and very sickly.

20 June 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. June 20. Another warm oppressive day had a present of strawberries beauties and flowers an elegant bouquet. In the evening Mr. Hendrie walked home with me, and spent the evening. [p. 84]5 Em came home from rehearsal about half-past nine.

21 June 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. June 21, This is the longest day in the year. Belle moved to-day from Main Street into the 14th. Ward. Em. went to the Wasatch and the little girls to the Azalea, I was alone, Em. went to sleep with Belle after the meeting was over.

22 June 1876 • Thursday

Thursday June 22. Nothing unusual transpired, all things move on much the same; the weather is oppressive.

23 June 1876 • Friday

Friday June 23. The girls and boys are getting up an entertainment as a compliment to Ort before he goes away:6 they are having rehearsals constantly. Em went this evening I had some friends call on me, and went out with them, to take a walk enjoyed myself extremely. One of the most pleasant incidents of my monotonous life. We must have sympathy, and some outside influences at times we are scarcely formed capable of the continuous strain of self-possession and power of control of all our feelings passions and impulses espesially when passing through almost fiery ordeals.

24 June 1876 • Saturday

Sat. June 24. One of the most beautiful days Em. went to the 14th, Ward meeting. in the evening we had several callers and Mr. Hendrie came and spent the evening with us. We had a pleasant time and he seemed to enjoy it as if we were really his mother and sisters.

25 June 1876 • Sunday

Sun. June 25. Em. went out to Salt Lake with Frank Kimball, came home at evening all right. We had a pleasant evening lots of young people around,

26 June 1876 • Monday

Mon. June 25 [26]. Went up to the office and left the girls all right soon after Em. in helping to move the book-case was hurt [p. 85] it falling on her doubling her up and injuring her most in the back where the weight fell. She herself thought her back was broken the pain was so severe. Dr. Anderson & Benedict examined her and said no bones were broken and no injury apparent except crushing and bruising. It will of course require tender nursing and solicitous care and attention. She suffers very much: we could not get her up stairs, fixed her up in the dining room, on a lounge: every one was very attentive and kind, many times she was administered to during the day.

27 June 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. June 26 <27>. Em is still suffering acutely from sickness at the stomach and faintness. I feel so worn out and worried, no strong arm to lean upon only myself and my faith and trust in God my Heavenly Father. All my life-long this has been one of the principal features of my experience; to discipline myself to bear all things alone. It teaches one to be self-contained and to have strength of character.

28 June 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. June 27 <28>. Em is a little better, this morning we got her carried up stairs. Ort and B. [Brigham] B. Young, took her up in a rocking chair. she seemed much easier and sat up for a few minutes. In the evening we had lots of folks call

29 June 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. June 28 <29>th, Em. did not seem near so well, I sent up to have the sisters from the Relief Society come and administer to her. We all tried to exercise all the faith we could and she did get easier. [p. 86]

30 June 1876 • Friday

Friday June 29 <30>, This is the last day of June it is very hot, tomorrow the folks will be home Annie is going down to meet them. Em. is better but she is taking too much trouble over the Entertainment. In the evening there were lots of our friends called.

Footnotes

  1. [1]Lorenzo Dow Young, in whose office the Woman’s Exponent staff first met.

  2. [2]EBW described visits from journalists like these: “We have received recently pleasant calls from many of the strangers who have visited Salt Lake City; persons of cultivation, polish and refinement. Some editors and correspondents of different papers, who seemed to think our Exponent a very creditable Woman’s paper, although not approving of some of the principles we advocate. To persons expressing themselves thus, we invariably make the same answer. We endeavor to advocate the principles in which we believe, and practice what we teach; to express the opinions of the women of Utah in regard to Woman’s capacity[,] sphere of duty and usefulness, as regards not only temporal but spiritual salvation.” (“Home Affairs,” Woman’s Exponent, 15 June 1876, 5:12.)

  3. [3]Wife of Henry S. Kimball, to whom EBW had talked before. (See EBW, Diary, 26 and 27 Apr. 1876.)

  4. [4]EBW had rightly worried about her husband’s trip through rough terrain. One of Daniel H. Wells’s companions on this trip to the northern Arizona colonies, Bishop Lorenzo Roundy, drowned in the crossing of the Colorado River at Lee’s Ferry. (Peterson, Take Up Your Mission, 75–80, 78n30.) One author attributes Roundy’s death to a lapse in judgment on the part of Daniel H. Wells who, against the advice of the ferryman, insisted on using the larger ferry in high water. (Reilly, Lee’s Ferry, 63–70.) EBW interpreted the incident as an example of providential guidance: “The accident to President Wells and the brethren who were with him in the boat when it sunk in the Colorado river, would seem another strong testimony of the interposition of Divine Providence in behalf of His servants.” (“Home Affairs,” Woman’s Exponent, 15 June 1876, 5:12.)

  5. [5]text: Page break occurs between “eve” and “ning”.

  6. [6]Friends in the Wasatch Literary Association staged a farewell benefit for Orson F. Whitney as he departed for New York City, where he intended to make a career in drama. However, a mission call intervened, and in October the group gave him a second testimonial in the Fourteenth Ward assembly rooms. (Walker, “Growing Up in Early Utah,” 71; “Home Affairs,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Nov. 1876, 5:85.)