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May 1876


1 May 1876 • Monday

Mon. May 1. Em. in fact Miss Cooks school and several others turned out “enmasse” to tramp over the hills etc. to gather wild flowers and take a sniff of pure mountain air. after the dull winter hours, in the school-room.

President Wells and Young and party started South on their intended tour by the seven o’clock train; Lou. went down with them I did not feel that I had time. It seems lonely to think of their going so far away. Martha [Harris Wells] has gone.

2 May 1876 • Tuesday

Tuesday May 2d. I have been having a little work done in the office, callers keep coming and work accumulates. In the evening made some calls with Miss MacClean.

3 May 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday May 3d. This is Sister Bathsheba Smiths birthday she is fifty-four: our Relief Society had a quilting then, and Br. Taylor and Orson Pratt took dinner with about twenty ladies. We had pleasant time, and lots of blessings bestowed upon Sister Smith, in which all the ladies present participated more or less. In the evening Em. went to the Wasatch, Lou to the 14th, ward society and Annie and I were at home alone. Mother Whitney Sister Thompson and daughter1 called on Sister Young to day [p. 74]

4 May 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. May 4th, I was busy all day long. Several persons called and chatted and made inquiries. the weather was fine the most beautiful sunset.

5 May 1876 • Friday

Friday May 5th. Br. [George] Reynolds was in the office told me my husband had not been well. It made me excessively gloomy. In the afternoon I could not sit and work, came home early. There was a gay crowd to spend the evening and music and lively conversation helped to dispel the gloom.

6 May 1876 • Saturday

Sat. May 6th. Another lovely day, so clear and pleasant. Inez [Earl] came in on a visit, in the evening the moonlight was enchanting,

7 May 1876 • Sunday

Sun. May 7th. Went to have strawberries and cream for the first time this season. we all went together, then Lou. and I went to meeting. Afterwards saw Lula Richards and we called on Mrs. Staines; were pleasantly entertained for a few minutes or half an hour; returned home to find a housefull of young people. Carrie had her baby blessed today, Lucy [Woodward Hewlings] George Carrie Mary [Earl] and baby were all here.

8 May 1876 • Monday

Mon. May 8th. This is so beautiful a day one can scarcely stay in doors, the fragrance of apple-blossoms float upon the air and the sunshine floods the room with warmth and pleasure. <Sister> Eliza called in reference to the Fair.2 Lydia Ann and I called to see sister Horne. I had a complimentary ticket to the theatre; it was Jim Harris benefit3 [p. 75] Em. & I went together Will and Mell were there too and we all sat in one crowd. The bill was not a successful one. Mr. [Henry H.] Honore is again here, we met him at the theatre this evening

9 May 1876 • Tuesday

Tuesday May 9th, This afternoon the President’s party arrived in St. George all well and in good spirits, they were well received and entertained with great applause and welcome on their arrival. Spent a very busy day myself, the weather is delightful. birds flowers sunsets all combine to make every scene of nature more beautiful. the whole earth seems full of melody. Arriving at home late I found Ort. here and Mr. Honore and Mr. [Chauncey T.] Bowen and Mr. Dr. [James M.] Page here called here they are Chicago men,4 and as the negro minstrels were at the theatre playing we went all in a party together to hear them. I never saw people laugh so much. I wrote to my husband <today>

10 May 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday May 10th. This is one of the most eventful days in all our history as a nation, a day ever to be chronicled that of <a> National Jubilee after a hundred years, in America. To me it is a day fraught with tender memories of sweetest pathos and in my heart it lives and keeps sentinel, as one of the most peculiar and eventful days of my whole existence. A friend of mine for whom I entertain the highest esteem returned to day from San Francisco where he has passed the winter. The Wasatch met here and had a tea-party after the meeting adjourned: the young ladies dressed in Yankee costumes of one hundred years ago. We had dough-nuts [p. 76] tea and pop-corn. Several elderly ladies came in costume and surprised us; every thing went off pleasantly. Today I made Sister Eliza a present of a parasol. she was very much embarrassed at taking it.

11 May 1876 • Thursday

Thursday May 11th, After a most fatiguing day, sultry and so forth returned home found Em. preparing to go to the theatre. and also Annie. Louie to a party. Mr. Hendrie called for the first time, previous to their starting: he staid and spent the evening. wrote to Martha Wells.

12 May 1876 • Friday

Friday May 12th, One of my busiest days scarcely could get time to breathe; went down town to do some trading– the wind is blowing disagreeably. Rip Van Winkle at the theatre to night. This morning Mr. Hendrie went to Stockton.

13 May 1876 • Saturday

Sat. May 13th, A very unpleasant day, rain and wind etc.

14 May 1876 • Sunday

Sunday May 14th, The rain continued incessantly pouring until about three in the afternoon– when the sun broke forth and all was brightness. In the evening Mr. Honore Mr. Bowen & Dr. Page came and spent the evening Ort was here to help entertain them. They staid until very late, there were ever so many boys up stairs, with the girls. We had a very pleasant time indeed talking, singing. playing.

15 May 1876 • Monday

Monday May 15. To-day we have been mailing all day long, in the afternoon Mr. Bowen called at the office and wanted Em. to go to Ogden with a party, who were going up with the Jarley [p. 77] Wax Works. She went about 4 o’clock. I was alone all the evening.

16 May 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. May 16. This is a splendid day every thing is so fine. only it storms and is so cold we can scarcely keep warm near the fire all the time, had a good fire all day in the office.

17 May 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. May 17. Another unpleasant storm wind rain snow and all the rest of it. Ort and Em. went to the Wasatch, and Louie to the Azalea.5 Annie and I were at home. This morning my husband left St. George for Kanab to proceed from there to Arizona.

18 May 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. <May 18.> The weather is a little more propitious Em. & I went down to Mell’s to spend the evening. Mr. & Mrs. [Duncan M. and Catherine Perkes] MacAllister were there & Mr. & Mrs. [William H. and Mathilda Johannisson] Perkes. We had tea a very pleasant social tea & afterwards wine beer oranges etc.

19 May 1876 • Friday

Friday <May 19.> I went today to see after a sick woman. a Roman Catholic, met the Rev. Mother and <one of> the good sisters.6 Went again to take some nourishment and a change of underclothing, In the evening Em. & Ort were here together Annie & Louie went to the Theatre. Mr. Hendrie called for a few moments on his way to the theatre and I went with him to call upon the sick woman and get her ready for the night. Saw Mr. J. H. Leyson and had an interesting conversation with him

20 May 1876 • Saturday

Sat. May 20. Was very busy in the office all day preparing copy etc. No word from the absent. Louie went to the matinee with Rob. [p. 78]

21 May 1876 • Sunday

Sunday May 21. This morning the ground was covered with snow, the mountains look so bleak and cold in the distance; at evening the snow lay in great heaps among the shrubs and bushes: how desolate it makes everything look. We have heard the fruit is killed South in many of the settlements with the cold. Annie has been ill this afternoon Hebe was here with Em. and the girls Belle came full of trouble and sorrow. Louie went home with her. May God bless my darlings and keep them safe from harm. It seems to me sometimes as if I could not endure much more: it is indeed terrible. O if my younger girls must suffer so I would rather they should die. I pray God to help me to-night. My heart is so sad I would I could see you, my dearest friend my husband, but there is no possible chance. I must be self-supporting in and of myself I must have the courage to endure. I have many comforts now that I never enjoyed before. In many things I am blessed.

22 May 1876 • Monday

Mon. <May 22.> This is a beautiful day and I have been very busy all day. Went down to Belle’s she was feeling a little better.

23 May 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. May 23. To-day was lovely Dr. Page with a party of Chicago people called on me at the office and were very kind and invited me to call if I ever came to Chicago or any of my daughters. In the evening Mr. [L. O.] Tanner and Mr. Hendrie came and spent the evening. We had a pleasant time.

24 May 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday May 24. Em. was taken very ill early in the morning and continued so throughout the day and evening. The Azalea met here in the evening. [p. 79]

25 May 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. May 25. Em. was better but felt like sleeping and in the afternoon entered upon her duties as teacher although she seemed quite ill. In the evening she had company here, Louie went down to Mellie’s and Mr. Tanner & Mr. Hendrie went down to Mellie’s.

26 May 1876 • Friday

Friday May 26. The weather is very warm and pleasant. And I have been very busy all day at evening Em. went to the concert with Mr. Tanner.

27 May 1876 • Saturday

Sat. May 27. The young people nearly all went May-walking. Em. not feeling well went down to Mells. instead Mr. Honore & Dr. Page called in the morning. We had callers at the office. People from the Walker House. Transients here just for a short time. T. A. Lyne’s benefit to night at the theatre. The moonlight nights are grand. and the weather is delightful.

28 May 1876 • Sunday

Sun <May> 28. I went to the tabernacle Em. was not feeling well we passed a very lonely evening. dull and almost stormy.

29 May 1876 • Monday

Mon. May 29. A day full of disagreeables. Em. went with Frank Kimball to the Lake House to a party. Lou. went out to spend the evening. Mr. Hendrie called early and spent the evening. We had a pleasant conversation.

30 May 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. May 30. Decoration Day; drizzly rain fell all day at intervals making it quite unpleasant. Excursions went out to different points of interest; in the afternoon the committee for the fair held their first meeting in the Social Hall, I attended [p. 80]

went a short distance in a carriage and in getting out my dress caught causing me to fall underneath the wheels of the vehicle and being faint took me some time to recover: fortunately I was not seriously hurt. In the evening I went over to the house to see my husbands patriarchal blessing7 and Katie [Wells] came home with me, and spent the evening. Ort and Rob [Robert W. Sloan] were here and Mr. Hendrie came and brought a young friend of his from Chicago Mr. Andrews. We passed a short time very pleasantly indeed.

31 May 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes day <May 31.> evening Em. went to the Wasatch and I was alone all the evening Annie & Lou. had company up stairs.

Footnotes

  1. [1]Likely Mercy Fielding Thompson and Mary Jane Thompson Taylor.

  2. [2]A committee from the Senior and Junior Retrenchment Associations planned a territorial fair to open 6 July 1876 in the Old Constitution Building. (“R. S. Reports,” Woman’s Exponent, 15 June 1876, 5:10.)

  3. [3]“Jim” was a mistaken entry for “W. T.” Harris, manager of the Salt Lake Theatre, who starred in a public benefit performance. (“Postponed,” Salt Lake Herald-Republican, 2 May 1876, 3; “The Benefit,” Salt Lake Herald-Republican, 9 May 1876, 3.)

  4. [4]One of the local newspapers mentioned these “Chicago men,” with a slight difference in the names: “Mr. H. H. Honore, father-in-law to Colonel Fred. Grant, Mr. C. F. Bowen, and Mr. J. J. Page, of Chicago, also come in on last night’s train. and are at the Townsend.” (“Visitors,” Salt Lake Herald-Republican, 7 May 1876, 3.)

  5. [5]The Azalea Society was formed of young people who divided into parties for cultural competition. (Walker, “Growing Up in Early Utah,” 72.)

  6. [6]Sister M. Augusta Anderson (later Mother Augusta), arrived in 1875 with Sister M. Raymond Sullivan to establish the first convent in Utah Territory. It operated under the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, a group concerned with education and nursing. (Mooney, Salt of the Earth, 67, 118, 171; Sister M. Georgia Costin, “Mother M. Augusta [Anderson],” 34, 36–42.)

  7. [7]A patriarchal blessing in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is given by an ordained priesthood holder called a patriarch, who offers “admonitions, promises, and assurances.” The patriarch declares lineage and pronounces blessings to be fulfilled conditional upon faithful living. These statements are recorded for the recipient, and a copy is kept in the Church Archives in Salt Lake City. (See William James Mortimer, “Patriarchal Blessings,” in Ludlow, Encyclopedia of Mormonism, 3:1066–1067.)