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April 1876


1 April 1876 • Saturday

Sat. Apr. 1. Mailing all day, we were busy but got through with it. Miss Ida [I. Cook] called and afterwards Miss Mary E. Cook. In the evening went home late and alone. [p. 65]

2 April 1876 • Sunday

Sun. Apr. 2d, Went up to Mell’s to dinner and had a nice time, called on Hannah [Free Wells]’s on my way home. Mell went with me, Abbie [C. Wells] returned from South yesterday been away nearly six months. In the evening we had some company here, Annie went to ward meeting I called on sister Horne. Called on Dr. Anderson. to consult him.

3 April 1876 • Monday

Mon. Apr. 3d. I was alone at the office all day preparing copy. wrote some letters to day went down to Belle’s and had some dinner.

4 April 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. Apr. 4. This was a warm pleasant day working until evening and then just as I was preparing to go home, my husband came in, and we staid until nine o’clock then he came home with me we had a good time. Em. & Louie went to the 18th, Ward concert in the Social Hall. Em. with Ort. [Orson F. Whitney] and Lou. with David Hilstead.

5 April 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. Apr. 5. This was a beautiful day at about 17. minutes to five, while the city was totally unprepared, suddenly came a crash and no one could have time to think ere another and then another in quick succession, the smoke issuing from the mountains north of the city; many for a moment imaging an earthquake; or a volcano– the opinions and feelings of people were various I was alone in the office writing a letter; when the window came in all at once the blind flying directly over to the desk. I started up, exclaiming, O, my poor children– and started for the door, before I could reach the middle door the second shock came, and I reeled but did not fall, in the front room I met the third shock and more windows came in. [p. 66]

Then I got out into the street and heard some one say it was the Arsenal had blown up.1 Many people were fearfully frightened, and four persons killed others severely and some slightly injured. It was the most horrifying catastrophe I ever experienced. The Providence of God seems to have been exercised in our behalf, or we might have suffered much more materially. I was weak and trembling afterwards. Emma & Mellie were both nearly frantic worrying about me. There is great damage done in all parts of the city. Em. went to the Wasatch at <Kit’s> and Louie to the 14th Ward. Annie & I were here alone

6 April 1876 • Thursday

Thursday Apr. 6. This is the Semi Annual Conference I staid to keep open the office, our finances being behind. There are many people in town who have come to go to meeting; the day is rather cold. In the evening Em. went to the theatre with Ort. to see Edwin Adams play the “Marble Heart” I was not feeling quite right after the fright I had. To-day has been very exciting, gathering up the remains of the bodies blown to pieces by the explosion.

7 April 1876 • Friday

Sat. Friday Apr. 7. Some country people called to see me; It has been very windy and rather unpleasant. The funeral of Br. [Frank] Hill & [Charles] Richardson was twelve o’clock to-day, Mother went, afterwards came round to the office and came home with me. Sister [Mary A. E. Dyas] Watmough spent the evening.

8 April 1876 • Saturday

Sat. Apr. 8. This is Mrs. L. G. Richards birthday she is 27. I presented her with a “Book of Mormon”. Went up to see her at evening, [p. 67]

Lou. had visitors this afternoon. Miss Nellie [S.] Godbe Miss Amanda Colburn, the Spencers. At evening A Surprise Party came to surprise Annie;

9 April 1876 • Sunday

Sunday April 9. Went to conference, it closed and adjourned until next October. In the evening we had lots of company, and conference folks calling.

10 April 1876 • Monday

Monday, Apr. 10. Priscilla [C.] Clive’s birthday, it is very pleasant,

11 April 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. Apr. 11, Today I finished paying the printers and felt it to be a blessed relief. This is Belle’s wedding day.

12 April 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday Apr. 12. This has been another of our pleasant days, in the evening my husband came over to me and we had a pleasant interview, the Wasatch met at my house, and had an agreeable meeting. Gilmore’s band performed in the theatre this evening Annie & Louie went.

13 April 1876 • Thursday

Thursday April 13, This is Emeline [Young Wells]’s birthday she is nineteen today. this is the first time Gilmore’s band performed in the theatre in the afternoon Miss Emma C. Thursby sang The Last Rose of Summer and Trills etc. Mr. Leevy [Jules Levy] the most celebrated cornet player in America

14 April 1876 • Friday

Friday evening April 14. I was invited to Mrs. [Katherine Howard] Brockbank’s to visit, but owing to the delay of the printers could not go until evening. About 6, it commenced to rain gently and we had a most refreshing shower.

15 April 1876 • Saturday

Sat. Apr. 15. Very warm and weather fine the meeting in the fourteenth ward was very full, we were busy all day, One very distinguished gentleman called upon us in the office [p. 68]

16 April 1876 • Sunday

Sun. Apr. 16. I went to see after some sick people, an elderly gentleman named Nobles had died– and at two we went to the funeral, afterwards I went to Mellie’s and then returned home found Mr. [John H.] Leyson here, Em. was engaged out to assist Miss Cook with the programme for the exhibition. the girls had some of the young company, their associates here and were up stairs with them.

17 April 1876 • Monday

Monday Apr. 17. We <could not> finished our mailing as it seemed we had so many calls: and Miss Cook had rehearsal in the afternoon. In the evening I went to tea about half-past six to Sister Bathsheba Smith’s and mother was there. Annie the hired girl had the measles. I went to the exhibition, it was very entertaining. Louie sung “Put me in my little bed.” Daisie [D. Dunford] sung “As the sun climbs over the hill or “The little Lavender-girl.” she did extraordinarily well.

18 April 1876 • Tuesday

Tuesday Apr. 18, This is Dessie [Martha Deseret Wells]’s birthday she is 23. Em. was invited over to dinner but did not attend. In the evening Em. went to a concert in the 17th, ward, Lou. went to the boys’ debate. Sister Eliza invited Lula and I to go to Ogden.

19 April 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. Apr. 20, <19th,> We lift the city on a special train to go to Ogden, there were a select few only; President Young, Sister Eliza, Susan [Susannah Snively Young] Margaret [Pierce Young] Martha [Bowker Young] Zina [D. H.untington Young] and Amelia [Folsom Young]: of the Twelve John Taylor Wilford Woodruff Orson Pratt Joseph F. Smith Brigham Young Jr. Lula and I, Mrs. Horne Miss Taylor <Mrs.> Bathsheba Smith and granddaughter Carrie Carter. Br. [William C.] Dunbar Editor of Herald, Adam Spears [Speirs]; we had a very pleasant time, The Ladies Home Industrial establishment2 was dedicated by prayer; [p. 69] and the preaching was all dedicatory and encouraging to the sisters. Bro. Taylor spoke of the Exponent in particular,

We had dinner at Franklin D. Richards all the party and returned immediately arriving about <1/2 past> four o’clock. Mellie’s babe is very sick. Lou. has gone to stay all night with her.

20 April 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. Apr. 20. A busy day lots of callers, and went to see my husband about having windows mended sent some one to see after it; in the evening we had lots of callers; Alf. Barnetts Troup Comic is here playing.

21 April 1876 • Friday

Friday Apr. 21. This is Br. Manson [J. Woodward]’s birthday; all these reminders of other days come to us fresh and dewy and full of tender associations they recall joys and sorrows shared together in childhood, we can never put away from us these emotional feelings which connect us with our own kindred. Sweet memories of childhood. We shall carry them with us while we live. <my husband spent the evening in the office with me.>

22 April 1876 • Saturday

April 22. This is a beautiful day warm and sunshiny I am not feeling very well slept little last night had ever so many calls to-day; the windows are all finished.

23 April 1876 • Sunday

Sunday April 23d, was unable to sit up at all nervous headache very severe. Belle & Mellie came and brought their children and staid to dinner. Br. [Millen] Atwood came and administered to me. I never sat up one minute all day and suffered excruciatingly. slept very little.

24 April 1876 • Monday

Mon. April 24. Went to the office though weak and trembling, had a man to see about the blinds. ordered a new washstand. it came in the afternoon. Went to see Mrs. Jarley’s Wax Works–[p. 70]

25 April 1876 • Tuesday

Tues. Apr. 25. <Annual> Meeting of the Relief Society in the Assembly Rooms,3 Charlie [Charles A.] Long is to be buried too. A man4 was drowned in City Creek this morning. that lived in Mother Whitney’s house. he left a wife and two children. we were terribly frightened in the evening.

26 April 1876 • Wednesday

Wednes. Apr. 26. I have been busy all day unusually so, was over at the house a few minutes. Came home early went to call on Mr. H. [Henry] S. Kimball by special request of his wife;5 he was not at home. Em. went to the Wasatch Lou. to the Association in the 14th, Ward. I had the toothache severely. Em came home in awful pain could scarcely get home. She suffered much pain through the night.

27 April 1876 • Thursday

Thurs. Apr. 27. Rose very early and went up to the office Mellie moved to the 7th, Ward today We held our regular meeting at Sister Smith’s to-day. Relief Society. Mother Whitney was there seemed very feeble indeed, the sisters administered to her; I went with her afterwards down to Mary Jane’s. The Negro Minstrels came in to-day the Georgia Minstrels, Em. & Lou. went to see them tonight. Julian was here, Carl, George A. [Richards] and Jimmie [Ferguson]. This morning Mr. Kimball called to see me. Spent an hour very pleasantly.

28 April 1876 • Friday

Friday April 28. Today has been pleasant busy went out to dinner, had some pleasant calls from friends received some letters, which were interesting. in the evening Annie went to the theatre.

29 April 1876 • Saturday

Sat. Apr. 29. Mellie has moved into the seventh ward and is just about settled. Tomorrow I shall go down this evening I staid late at the office to finish mailing. [p. 71]

30 April 1876 • Sunday

Sun. April 30. This is a very pleasant day but rather cool. Went down to Mellie’s it is Leslie [A. Dunford]’s birthday. he is four years old. When I came home [Francis] Ashbell Pomeroy wife6 and baby7 were here, Mr. Byrne called for a few minutes. I went up to bid my husband goodby <be>fore going <away>

Footnotes

  1. [1]Two boys in their teens, Charles Richardson and Frank Hill, had been target shooting near stores of gunpowder in the arsenal just below Ensign Peak, north of Salt Lake. A burning paper wad that had been fired from a gun ignited loose powder on the ground near the ammunition magazines and sparked the explosion. Shocks were felt fifteen or more miles both north and south. The two boys were immediately killed in the explosion. Flying rocks killed three-year-old Joseph H. Raddon playing in his yard and Mary Jane Van Natta, a pregnant mother pumping water near her home down the hill. (“The Horror,” Salt Lake Tribune, 6 Apr. 1876, 4; Sillitoe, History of Salt Lake County, 87–88.)

  2. [2]Contributing to the home industry movement, this new Relief Society building in Ogden, Utah, contained a store in front and workroom/meeting space at the back. (“Home Affairs,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 May 1876, 4:181.)

  3. [3]In the report of their annual meeting, officers of the Salt Lake City Thirteenth Ward Relief Society were listed as Rachel R. Grant, president; Bathsheba W. Smith and Lydia Ann Wells, counselors; Elizabeth H. Goddard, secretary; Emmeline B. Wells, assistant secretary; and Relief Atwood, treasurer. (“Letters,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 June 1876 5:5.)

  4. [4]Charles Dumas, printer and part owner of the Evening Mail, had an apartment at the Whitney’s where he lived with his wife and children. One night, while intoxicated, he began wrestling with his friend J. E. Jeffery. After Mrs. Dumas took her husband’s pistol to John K. Whitney to keep Dumas from shooting someone, Dumas left the house and was found the next morning face down in a culvert. (“Drowned,” Salt Lake Tribune, 26 Apr. 1876, 4.)

  5. [5]Martha G. Kimball.

  6. [6]Mary Ann Rich Pomeroy.

  7. [7]Mary L. Pomeroy.