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January 1876


EVENTS IN EMMELINE B. WELLS’S DIARY FOR 1876

17 February

Visited the Utah territorial legislature with other women.

5 April

Explosion at an arsenal shattered windows in her office and killed four people in the north section of the city.

19 April

Attended dedication of the “Ladies Home Industrial establishment” in Ogden with Brigham Young and others.

4 July

Salt Lake City held a grand centennial Fourth of July celebration.

5–6 July

Daughter Annie helped host the Ladies’ Centennial Territorial Fair, featuring home industries.

13 October

Prepared her first article on grain storage as head of the new movement.

1 January 1876 • Saturday

Jan. 1. 1876 We did not receive calls neither did any of our family, but a few people (young boys mostly) called in a friendly way;

2 January 1876 • Sunday

Sunday Jan 2. Went to meeting had company in the evening,

3 January 1876 • Monday

<Mon.> Jan 3. I had several persons here to spend the evening Em. [Emeline Whitney Wells] went up to Kittie Heywoods [Lucretia Heywood].

4 January 1876 • Tuesday

<Tues.> Jan. 4. Went out to spend the evening came home very early.

5 January 1876 • Wednesday

<Wednes.> Jan 5. Em. went to the Wasatch [Literary Association]–

6 January 1876 • Thursday

<Thurs. Jan 6.> Mr. [William C.] Hendrie2 called to bid us good-by before going to the San Francisco.

7 January 1876 • Friday

Friday Jan. 7. Park [Woods] who was very ill since Sunday night with pneumonia is very much worse, he is dangerously ill. Will [William W. Woods] is nearly sick waiting upon him. His uncle3 has been to see him several times. Lile [Eliza Woods Wallin] who was confined a few days since is not able to see him at all.

8 January 1876 • Saturday

Sat. Jan. 8. Park died4 about twenty minutes past four Mell [Melvina Whitney Woods] and I went together to see him. We are going to have him brought to our house tomorrow. The funeral will take place on Monday.

9 January 1876 • Sunday

Sun. Jan. 9. Park was brought towards evening by the Red Men,5 two of them came to stay all night Hebe [Heber M. Wells] staid too. The Esquire6 came down and staid until real late. We had a very pleasant conversation he seemed much affected by Park’s death; it recalled his sister’s7 memory fresh and touched him deeply. Arza Hinckley Joshua [K. Whitney] and Carloss [Don Carlos Whitney] were here John [K. Whitney] too.

10 January 1876 • Monday

Mon. Jan. 10. The funeral was at ten o clock Bishop [Daniel S.] Tuttle presiding; the red men were also in attendance and performed their part of the [p. 57] burial service.

There has been considerable sickness during the last few weeks. Scarlet fever and diptheria are prevalent among children pneumonia among grown up people.

29 January 1876 • Saturday

Jan. 29. The Woman’s Centennial Executive Committee had a benefit at the theatre. The play of Gen. Putnam was performed, we had a 500 dollar house and cleared not quite 200. [p. 58]

Footnotes

  1. [1]See “Committees on the Grain Movement, Minutes, November 17, 1876,” in Derr et al., First Fifty Years, 399–401.

  2. [2]For background on William Hendrie and his relationship to EBW and her family, see EBW, Diary, 9 Aug. 1874, note.

  3. [3]Daniel H. Wells.

  4. [4]Nehemiah Park Woods, listed as deputy marshal, was praised for personal integrity and for his work in developing iron and coal fields in southern Utah. (“Death of N. Park Woods,” Salt Lake Tribune, 9 Jan. 1876, 1.)

  5. [5]The Improved Order of Red Men fraternal brotherhood had two lodges in Salt Lake City, called the Washtukie and the Pocatello, meeting alternate Wednesday evenings over Cohn’s store on Main Street. (“Red Men,” Salt Lake Tribune, 9 Jan. 1876, 3.) These fraternal brothers assisted at the wake and burial.

  6. [6]Honorific name for Daniel H. Wells.

  7. [7]Catherine Chapin Wells Woods.