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September 1875


1 September 1875 • Wednesday

Wednes. Morn. Sep. 1. This was the day of my little Eugene’s birth. thirty-one years ago;1 how sad it makes me to think I never had another son. how very anxious I have been to have one how prayed and struggled with the Lord to obtain this blessing and still it has been denied me, how hard it is to understand all these things [p. 28]

George A. Smith died this morning twenty minutes to nine. they telegraphed to my husband to return back also Franklin D. Richards and Lorenzo Snow, he went off very suddenly at the last. walked into his parlor and died in his chair in five minutes. I went for a short ride with Belle. The Wasatch met in the evening.

2 September 1875 • Thursday

Thurs. Sep. 2. Went to meeting in the afternoon, have not seen my husband yet to speak to him since his return. met with a grievous disappointment to-day feel very much annoyed in consequence of it; it is very hard work for me to control my feelings under certain circumstances. Miss Beldon [Hattie Belden] was married this evening at the Episcopal Church to Lieut Loryd [C. F. Lloyd]. Annie went to witness the ceremony. I went to Belle’s to supper.

3 September 1875 • Friday

Friday Sep. 3. This has been one of the most tiresome days, work and dust and lots of other things.

4 September 1875 • Saturday

Sat. Sep. 4. Today no school Em. & Annie went up to the warm springs in the evening Mr. Tanner was here Ort and Briggie [Brigham S.] Young. We had music in abundance.

5 September 1875 • Sunday

Sun. Sep. 5. George A. Smith was buried from the Tabernacle, it was crowded with people, galleries and all were full. The directions he had given in his will were carried out, Br. George Q. Cannon read the 15th chapter of first Corinthianns, Extract from 19th, chapter of Alma in the book of Mormon [p. 29] I saw my husband for a few minutes and bid him Good-by. he mentioned to me in regard to an article in Woman’s Exponent upon the Resurrection written by Sister E. R. Snow, that President Young had said it was incorrect.2 He was very affectionate towards me, and expressed his regrets at not being longer in my company. Miss Wood from Springville spent the evening with us; Sister Goddard Sister R. R. Grant and sister Susan [Noble] Grant called on me. Mattie [Martha Ann] Pidcock went home today.

6 September 1875 • Monday

Mon. Sep. 6. President Wells Junius & his mother3 with a small company Franklin D. Richards and Lorenzo Snow accompanying them, started South for a tour through all the Southern settlements. President Young with quite a party went as far as York.

7 September 1875 • Tuesday

Tues. Sep. 7. The day has been a delightful one Belle came and took me out riding in the morning. In the evening Em & Annie went to Swift’s party at Louisa’s, Mr. Hendrie and Carloss were here I took my first real chess lesson. Little Lou. has been sick all the week, and staid from school.

8 September 1875 • Wednesday

Wednes. Sept. 8. Mr. Sears came from California today and went to Cache Valley by the afternoon train. There was a splendid shower of rain which was really refreshing. I bought myself a black cashmere dress. Went down to Mrs. Myer’s to have her make it. Ort was in the office during the afternoon and here in the evening, but went up to the Wasatch. President Young sent a letter to the Exponent.4

9 September 1875 • Thursday

Thurs. Sep. 9. I went down to the ninth ward saw Mary Jane, Madame Octavia Walton Le Vert called on me today, she is from Mobile [Alabama] [p. 30] we had so many callers; Mrs. [Elizabeth Harper] Brooks for one. bought Em. Tennyson’s Poems’ Annie got a parasol for her. Lou. gave <her a lletter case>.

10 September 1875 • Friday

Friday Sep. 10, This is Em.’s. birthday Inez slept here last night Inez and Em. went out riding with Mr. Tanner last evening. The evenings are very lovely indeed they had a nice time; we had lots of music afterwards. Will. & Mell. gave Em. a beautiful pair of vases. Sister Eliza called twice during the day. I invited Will to dinner went to his office.

11 September 1875 • Saturday

Sat. Sept 11. This morning on my way to the Office I met a very dear lady friend whose presence is always cheering. I went to the Meeting in the Tabernacle in the afternoon.5 Em. went for the first time. Mother came to the office to see me. and lots of other ladies. I am very tired tonight indeed. and my thoughts are altogether solemn, I feel as if I scarcely know what course to take for the best.

12 September 1875 • Sunday

Sun. Sep. 12th. This is rather a windy day, went up to the office in the morning and mailed some letters. Mell and children came down Belle and hers and Will came in time for dinner, we had a pleasant sociable time. music pleasant conversation nice comfortable dinner everything passed off pleasantly and social. Towards evening Mellie and I went for a ride together. which was most agreeably delightful; after our return Emmie and Belle went while away Ort came and sung and played for us, Zina came in with her children, altogether it was a very pleasant day and happily spent.

13 September 1875 • Monday

Mon. Sep. 13. John Whitney and Newel [K. Whitney]’s birthday it is a lovely day, everything pleasant, in the evening Mr. Hendrie came in and spent the evening with us sociably. [p. 31]

14 September 1875 • Tuesday

Tues. Sep. 14. Nothing of any special importance occurred I called on Sister [Bathsheba W.] Smith several ladies were invited to call upon <dine with> Sister Staines.6 I called upon Madame Le Vert at the Townsend House. found her most charming and agreeable, uncommonly interesting in manner and affectionate in her outbursts of delight and enthusiasm. I called afterward upon Dr. [Washington F.] Anderson, who is well acquainted with the history and antecedents of Madame Le Vert. spent a most particularly pleasant evening.

15 September 1875 • Wednesday

Sep. 15. This is one of my most eventful days one long to be remembered as characteristic of true and pure enjoyment. in the evening Em. went to the Wasatch Annie to Eleanor Taylor’s Lou. to Lizzie [Ann Elizabeth Riter] Young’s. The evening was glorious with moon and stars in splendor.

16 September 1875 • Thursday

Thurs. Sept. 16th. I went this morning to the Warm Springs in the buggy with Belle. we had a pleasant time and most happy ride; in the afternoon I was busy with the papers, and callers. in the evening Mrs. Richards and myself went to Madame Le Verts Readings, her first subject was the Pope etc. second of Gen. Jackson Henry Clay and many distinguished gentlemen she entitled it a Winter spent in Washington. Third a happy episode in her own life and her first acquaintance and subsequent intimacy with Henry Cla Washington Irving. Last A Bull Fight in the city of Seville in Spain. [p. 32] Mr. Hendrie called and gave the girls two tickets for the “Readings” he was attending a party at [Oliver and Mary] Durants’ across the street, I had on my new black cashmere dress for the first time, it is a very good dress trimmed with Yak lace and it fitted me very nicely and suited me well in every respect and the folks all complimented me upon my good figure etc. and Mr. H. who is a most fastidious gentleman said I looked better than he had ever seen me. I felt pleased because it is very seldom any one ever compliments me now and when one does not flatter it is gratifying to receive a compliment.

17 September 1875 • Friday

Friday Sept. 17.th. We have been busy mailing all day but about three in the afternoon Mrs. Lula Richards Mrs Dr. Levi Richards and myself made a call on Madame Le Vert, and I never passed two hours more entertainingly in all my life. She is a charming woman and was delighted with us, she embraced me most cordially in fact almost passionately and kissed me over and over again lifting my veil when she did so, she has such polish of manners such refinement of tone, such abundant treasures of knowledge. O how I would love to be familiarly associated with one who had seen so much of the best society and of the “literati.” In the evening I was not well and we all retired rather early.

18 September 1875 • Saturday

Sat. Sept. 18. In the morning on my way to the office I met a dear lady friend and we talked a few moments together. I was very very busy all day and at evening came home just sick. Mr. Hendrie came and took Em. for a short ride and afterwards he took me, the evening was lovely [p. 33] the moon was clearly beautiful and the blue haze upon the distant mountains seemed illuminated by it, we had a spirited horse and we drove with lightning speed. O how delightful it was; I shall ever remember it with pleasure, as well as his uninterested generosity in taking me because I was not well.

19 September 1875 • Sunday

Sunday Morning Sep. 19. Sep and Belle went to Ogden for a two day absence intending to go to Willard City before they return. Bessie the nurse and the two children are to stay here. I was sick but went to meeting in the afternoon Orson Pratt and John Taylor spoke to the people.

20 September 1875 • Monday

Monday Morning Sept. 20. Abbie [C. Wells] is twenty three today no notice taken of it, have been very busy all day in the office miserable too in health and spirits, melancholy beyond everything.

21 September 1875 • Tuesday

Tues. Sept. 21. This is one of the most memorable days of my life: eleven years ago today an event occured that has filled my whole remaining life with sorrowful remniscences. and yet I have had many blessings O how many God has indeed been most mindful of me, and His tender mercy has been over me all the day long: today I can thank Him with a heart overflowing with gratitude.

22 September 1875 • Wednesday

Wednes. Sept. 22. Today I have been full of grief all day tears would come in spite of my resistance, and my whole frame body and mind have been filled with sorrow and bitter memories. The Wasatch met here we had a pleasant time many pleasant calls and every opportunity to feel well, [p. 34]

23 September 1875 • Thursday

Thurs. Sept. 23d, Mr. E. [Edward] W. Tullidge7 from New York called to see me introduced himself and we passed an hour or two most pleasantly. He told me some of an author’s troubles and trials of his literary career, and his future anticipations; went up to my sister’s in the evening came home alone about ten o’clock

24 September 1875 • Friday

Friday Sept. 24. This is also an anniversary of an event never to be forgotten one of the happiest of my life, on this day I seemed to enter upon a new life one suited to my ideal nature. but to-night I am lonly so very lonely:

25 September 1875 • Saturday

Sat. Sept. 25. Today I have been very busy received many calls, in the evening we had visitors Mr. Hendrie came and staid a short time. heard some wonderful news.

26 September 1875 • Sunday

Sunday Sept. 26. Went to meeting did not feel well in the evening we had several calls.

27 September 1875 • Monday

Monday Sept. 27. Went down to Mellie’s and took dinner, sister Lucy and Carrie called in the evening Carrie spent the whole evening, had a letter from Dr. [Mary Safford] Blake. Tonight saw [Charles W.] Penrose and talked to him considerably; was very low-spirited nearly discouraged; what shall I do to get some means to relieve me from embarrassment. Things seem so hard to get along with darkness in regard to means of living etc. I feel very wretched in regard to household affairs.

28 September 1875 • Tuesday

Tues. Sep. 28. I spent the day in newspaper work and writing letters, in the evening Mr. Hendrie came and spent the evening with us told us he was going to American Fork; we had a very pleasant time O if we only had the means I would have some company [p. 35]8 around me that would be more inviting. and conversational; literary people;

29 September 1875 • Wednesday

Wednes. Sept. 29. This month is nearly past and the rich mellow golden days of the Indian summer are coming; how beautiful they are how brightly the sun shines, how delicious the ripe rich luscious fruits how charming the lovely sunsets, and how invigorating the breezes of evening. In the evening Em. went to the Wasatch, and I was so very busy and yet lonely.

30 September 1875 • Thursday

Thurs. Sept. 30. Em. has been ill all day long could not go to school at all, I was up and down to the office four times through the day. In the evening Em. dressed and came down stairs but could not go to German as she wished to. Lula and baby came to tea, and I went part way home with her; the little girls had some company.

Footnotes

  1. [1]EBW, Diary, 1 Sept. 1874, footnote.

  2. [2]“Mortal and Immortal Elements of the Human Body: A Philosophical Objection to the Resurrection Removed.” Maureen Ursenbach Beecher explains that Eliza R. Snow “followed Heber C. Kimball’s suggested format: besides the spirit, there are two parts of the body, one of which disintegrates and returns to earth, the other of which remains pure and untouched, awaiting the resurrection.” Brigham Young objected to this theory. (Beecher, Eliza and Her Sisters, 18–19.) Snow’s article first appeared in the Woman’s Exponent in 1873 and was reprinted in 1875. (Woman’s Exponent, 1 Dec. 1873, 2:99; Woman’s Exponent, 1 Sept. 1875, 4:54.)

  3. [3]Hannah Free Wells.

  4. [4]Brigham Young’s reprimand, dated 8 September 1875, was published as a letter to the editor, double spaced so it would be clearly noticed, on the editorial page in the Woman’s Exponent. (Young, Letter to the Editor, Woman’s Exponent, 15 Sept. 1875, 4:60.) John Taylor composed the formal theological rebuttal in the form of a letter to President Brigham Young. (Taylor, “Remarks on the Resurrection,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Oct. 1875, 4:65–66.) The Woman’s Exponent also printed Eliza R. Snow’s retraction, which was dated 19 March 1876. (Snow, Letter to the Editor, Woman’s Exponent, 1 Apr. 1876, 4:164.)

  5. [5]Senior and Junior Co-operative Retrenchment Association met in the morning in the Fourteenth Ward assembly rooms, receiving greetings from Madame Octavia Walton Le Vert and hearing from local leaders on home industries and other things. (“R. S. Reports,” Woman’s Exponent, 1 Oct. 1875, 4:67.)

  6. [6]Probably Lillias Lyon Staines.

  7. [7]In the Woman’s Exponent, EBW praised Tullidge’s intent to publish a book about early Latter-day Saint women—which would eventually be published as Women of Mormondom (New York: Tullidge and Crandall, 1877). (“Home Affairs,” Woman’s Exponent, 15 Oct. 1875, 4:76.)

  8. [8]text: Page break occurs between “compa” and “ny”.