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April 1881


1 April 1881 • Friday

Elizabeth is easier this morning. Met again with Council at 10 o’clock, and with Board of Regents of University of Deseret at 12.30.

As I have been very busy thro’ conference and unable to keep my journal according to date, I give a summary of what has transpired

On Friday the 1st we transacted a good deal of business connected with the Logan Temple and made appropriations to help push it forward. It was also decided that we should run in debt to crowd the Temple ahead, and that the Temple walls should be pointed on the outside and not plastered. I explained to the Council what I had done in Washington. Bro Erastus Snow gave an explanation of the conditional affairs upon the railroad in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona. The letter of instructions which was written by the First Presidency to himself, Brigham Young, Jno. W Young and Jesse N. Smith was examined and the telegraphic reply of Jno. W. was compared with the letter. It was found that his dispatch clearly gave the impression which all the council had at the time of its receipt, that he would comply with the letter of instructions and work in harmony with the other brethren in carrying it out. But Bro’s. Erastus and Brigham both stated that he declined to sign a memorandum which they drew up and which they had signed that carried out in effect the letter of instructions. They had no control of the contracts nor the means realized therefrom and though they had urged him to secure the brethren who had done work upon the grade for which he had drawn the pay, he refused to do so. There was a very strong feeling in the Council respecting his course; Prest. Taylor particularly feeling that a breach of confidence had been committed by him, and that he had taken advantage of us and had used us to further his own interests while at the same time he had refused to comply with the understanding that we had had with him. When we separated on Friday evening the matter was left with us to reflect upon and when we next met to state our views and respecting his conduct and what should be done.

2 April 1881 • Saturday

On Saturday the 2d we met with the Presidents of Stakes and their counselors and the Bishops’ agents and had some very plain talk respecting the manner in which the tithing funds were used. At the request of Prest Taylor I spoke and dwelt upon the necessity for greater strictness in the matter of handling funds that confidence may grow and the people be encouraged in the payment of their tithing in seeing it wisely disposed of. We met twice, in the morning and afternoon with the brethren and had a very good time. I accom[panied] Prest. Taylor between the meetings to his residence and he read to me a document which he had drawn up in relation to Jno W. Young’s conduct. It was a very strong document. He asked me what I thought of it. I replied that I thought it was almost too heavy a load <for him> to fire. at such an abject. I then stated to him the way in which I thought this case should be managed that it was not for Bro’s the First Presidency to take him up, but as Bro’s Erastus Snow and Brigham Young had been instructed to take a certain course with him and he had failed to comply with the counsel and had used Bro’s Jesse N. Smith and Brigham in letting out contracts, they had just cause of action against him and it seemed to me that the proper course would be for them to prefer a charge against him before a high council. This met his views, and he said that his object in writing this paper that he had read to me was that his views might be on record.

3 April 1881 • Sunday

On Sunday, 3d, our conference meeting was commenced at 10 o’clock in the New Tabernacle. Prest. Taylor spoke for a short time and called upon Bro’s Woodruff, Lorenzo Snow and F. D. Richards. The house was well filled for the first meeting. In the afternoon Bro. Orson Pratt came for a short time to the Tabernacle, but before the meeting closed he retired. I was called upon to speak and occupied the entire afternoon, being blessed with considerable freedom. After the meeting a Baptist clergyman by the name of Osborne, a brother of ex-Senator Osborne of Florida came to the stand and was introduced to me. We talked for half an hour. We met in Council after the afternoon meeting and decided that the Twelve should take Jno. W. Young’s case in hand. I stated my feelings upon this subject. I thought that it belonged to that quorum and that it was for them to deal with him. I did not like the idea of the president of the church being put in the gap all the time in cases of this kind. This was decided upon.

My wife Elizabeth‘s health is very much improved. This evening the Sunday school superintendents and teachers met in the assembly hall. I was present and el was late going home

4 April 1881 • Monday

Monday 4th met in Conference at 10 a.m. Presidents Smith and Taylor occupied the forenoon. The statistical report was read by myself in the afternoon and Bro. Erastus Snow and Elder John Nicholson occupied the time[.] I read some financial reports of the Logan and Manti Temples. This evening there was a meeting of the officers of Mutual Improvement Associations in the Assembly Hall.

5 April 1881 • Tuesday

Tuesday, 5th. The council o ke kanalima [of the Fifty] met at 10 o’clock and Prest. Taylor requested me to be present <while he attended conference.> We adjourned till 10 o’clock of the 8th so that it might not interfere with the conference. Bro’s. F. M. Lyman and Brigham Young occupied a portion of the forenoon and I spoke upon education. In the afternoon at 2 o’clock I met with the stockholders of Z. C. M. I[.] and then repaired to the Conference. Bro. Jno Henry Smith occupied a portion of the time and I followed by reading a variety of reports and was followed by Prest. Taylor. At 7 p.m. a priesthood meeting was held in the assembly hall and much good instruction was given. I stayed all night at my son Jno Q’s.

6 April 1881 • Wednesday

Wednesday 6th Elder Wm Budge and Prest Taylor and Elders Erastus Snow and F. D. Richards occupied part of the forenoon and I read a number of other reports. In the afternoon Prests Jos. F. Smith and Jno. Taylor occupied the time, and I presented the names of missionaries and authorities of the church. The Twelve had decided that the name of Bro Jno. W. Young should not be presented to the Conference until he should come and clear himself from the charges that were made against him. It was deemed advisable to make no comment upon it this being the suggestion of Prest. Taylor.

The Conference closed this evening (Apr 6). It has been a most excellent time. A calm serene feeling has prevailed at the meetings and confidence in the Almighty and his power to save have been apparent. It is quite remarkable that notwithstanding the outrageous conduct of Murray and the attacks which have been made upon us as a people, that not a single allusion was made to him or to his conduct during the Conference. No one appeared to have thought about him. As this had not pre-arranged I accept it as an evidence that we need not attach much importance to this conduct

7 April 1881 • Thursday

Thursday, 7th. A letter was written by the Twelve and signed by Bro. Woodruff as president, citing him to come here forthwith. It was entrusted to Bishop M. D. Hammond to carry. As they had laid this duty upon Bro. Brigham and he was very much bothered in framing it at his request I wrote the letter for him.

9 April 1881 • Saturday

This morning Sister Ingeparson or Tomander, her daughter Martha and son Dan., left our house to go back to Sanpete. They have been living with us for some time.

In the evening called upon Mr. Arthur Brown, my attorney, at his residence. Spent about an hour with him.

10 April 1881 • Sunday

Stormy. As I was suffering from a stiff neck and shoulders, I deemed it best to remain at home. In fact had to go to bed a part of the day I felt so badly.

11 April 1881 • Monday

I felt much better. Storming very heavily but I drove to town and attended to business in the office. It cleared up towards evening. The roads are in a shocking condition.

Monday, April 11th, 1881. Brother Henry Lunt, of Cedar, has been a considerable time in the office today making arrangements respecting the coal and iron mine which he held for the Trustee-in-Trust at Cedar City. He is to have one-third, and the Church two-thirds, the Church to purchase the claim from the Government, and to bear two-thirds of the working expenses.

Bishop Burton was in the office, also, and the practice of disbursing money in the General Tithing Office was talked over. There were three channels of disbursement which we thought improper, and gave directions that it should be confined to one, and that the Trustee-in-Trust’s office.

12 April 1881 • Tuesday

Tuesday, April 12th, 1881 President Taylor instructed me to make out a line of travel through our settlements south. I suggested this morning the propriety of taking a trip by rail from here either east or west and visiting our settlements in Arizona and Colorado. We could start out east and return west, or vice versa. Brother Erastus Snow, who was present, said we could reach all our settlements very conveniently and with little carriage travel. The idea was a novel one to President Taylor, but he was not averse to it, if the expense should not be too great.

Bro. Card was present today. He is the Superintendent of Logan Temple, and business connected with that building was transacted furnishing means, etc. His salary was increased from $1,500 to $1,800.

Upon my return this evening to my place, I found my wife Sarah Jane in Labor. Her mother was with her. She had a hard time, lost her strength, and the women were becoming discouraged. I administered to her, and in a few minutes (20 minutes to 7 o’clock) she was delivered of a fine boy.

13 April 1881 • Wednesday

Wednesday, April 13thI devote what time I can of a morning to my “Life of Nephi”, which I am trying to get ready for publication. Met with the Board of Directors of Z. C. M. I. today. Attended a meeting of business[.] Took dinner with Prest Taylor and attended council and prayer circle at the Endowment House. Considerable business was transacted

14 April 1881 • Thursday

Thursday, April 14th, At the office all day, attending to various business matters. Finished a letter to Gen. Thos. L. Kane

15 April 1881 • Friday

Friday, April 15th At the office with Presidents Taylor and Smith. Attended a meeting of the Deseret University. Wrote a letter to my son Franklin.

16 April 1881 • Saturday

Saturday, April 16th Spent the day in the office. Telegraphed to Prest George Teasdale, at Nephi, that if it should be desirable I would start for Nephi tomorrow morning and spend the remainder of the day with him in meeting and part of Monday. He telegraphed back, expressing the wish that I would come.

My wife wished me to purchase a piano. Went to David O. Calder’s to look at some. The trouble is, our taste and our money don’t correspond.

17 April 1881 • Sunday

Sunday, April 17th, 1881 Started for Nephi this morning. Travelled in company with Judge S. N. Dusenberry as far as Provo, and Sister Pardon Webb from Provo to Payson. Conversed with them and with Sister Grover. Wm. S. Godbe was on board the train, and sat on the seat in front of me. We had considerable conversation during which he said that he could unqualifiedly say that we were right and that we were acting upon our convictions. He did not like, however, to be called an apostate himself, for he said that he had not apostatized, but that he had followed his convictions, and been true to them in taking the course that he had. He spoke highly of Prest Young and said that he owed a great deal to him, and that his teachings greatly influenced his life. I told him he had reason to think well of Prest Young, for he had always been his true friend, and had treated him as kindly as if he had been his own son. Among other remarks he said that he had formulated what he called basic truths upon which he was endeavoring to act. He went on to describe them. They were really principles that he had learned from the Gospel, and had been taught by the Elders. I told him that all that he had stated as being his rules of life were embodied in the Gospel, as taught by the Elders in this Church. There is one thing noticeable about this man: He does not manifest the bitterness of feeling which apostates frequently exhibit, but he is full of sophistry and vanity, and a tendency to make fine speeches, and tendency that was always noticeable in him, even when he belonged to the Church.

I was met at the station by Prest George Teasdale with a carriage and taken immediately to the meeting house, where the Sunday School children were assembled, having been in session nearly two hours, and were now awaiting my arrival. I addressed them for thirty-five minutes. They listened very attentively, though no doubt tired by sitting. I dined at Bishop Andrews, in company with Prest Teasdale, Sister Pitchforth and Sister Harriet Ann Taylor Badger. In the afternoon addressed the Saints, and had considerable liberty. Took supper at Bro. Teasdale’s, in company with the same persons, Bishop Andrews and wife being of the company. In the evening had a meeting with the young men and young ladies associations. Lodged at Sister Pitchforth’s.

18 April 1881 • Monday

Monday, April 18th Met with the Priesthood at nine o’clock, being the principal officers of the Stake. They had a number of questions to ask, which I answered as best I could. One of these was respecting the steps necessary for a man who had held the Priesthood and had received his endowments and sealings and had been cut off from the Church, to regain his former standing. I told them that being cut off from the Church, he became and alien, and to become a member must be baptized and have hands laid upon him by one having authority. To regain his priesthood the same steps must be taken that are now taken with those who never held the priesthood, and respecting endowments and sealings in the absence of greater knowledge I should say that to have these confirmed upon him, it would be necessary for the man holding the keys to instruct an Apostle or some one authorized to re-confirm them upon him. Of course an Apostle having the sanction of him who holds the keys could seal upon him his patriarchal blessings and all the sealing ordinances including doubtless his endowments.

At half-past ten we met in conference, and after the authorities were submitted, I addressed the congregation for about two hours, and had a good flow of the spirit[.]

I returned home in the afternoon, having been absent about 34 hours, travelled 180 miles, and held five meetings within the time.

19 April 1881 • Tuesday

Tuesday, April 19th, 1881 Spent the day at the office Prest Taylor was absent most of the day. Bro. Jos F. Smith and myself examined into the condition of the tithing office and the method of dealing out tithing upon orders. We found that a strict account was kept of everything that came in, but there was no check upon the disbursements, and also we found looseness in regard to reports of men’s time and work for the Church. Prest Taylor came in while we were engaged in this business, and I stated to him what we were doing, which he approved and said he hoped we would continue. He was going to Ogden tomorrow, and would be gone all day.

20 April 1881 • Wednesday

Wednesday, April 20th Water is very high down at my place. All the canals are full and overflowing, and the low land in front of my place has the appearance of a lake. Spent the day as yesterday, and I think we have devised a plan that will remedy the evils which we find existing. As Prest Taylor was absent we continued our meeting. In discussing tithing matters, there were present, F. D. Richards, Brigham Young, F. M. Lyman, John H. Smith, and D. H. Wells. Also Bishops C. W. Hardy and R. T. Burton, E. F. Sheets, Bros. J. C. Kingsbury, James Jack and Niels Rasmussen to get the benefit of their experience. As Prest Taylor was absent the Council of Apostles did not meet in the endowment House, but in the office. We had several questions respecting doctrine and jurisdiction of Bishops brought up.

21 April 1881 • Thursday

Thursday, April 21 At the office all day. Prest Taylor was absent during the forenoon. He came in for a short time in the afternoon, when Elder F. D. Richards was appointed to go to Box Elder Stake Conference and Elders F. M. Lyman and John Henry Smith to attend the Tooele Conference.

My wife Elizabeth and son David came up and we went to the Theater. She invited her sister Emily to accompany us. We stopped all night at my son John Q.’s

22 April 1881 • Friday

Friday, April 22nd, 1891Prest Jos. F. Smith, my brother Angus, Henry Groo, Jesse W. Fox, Thos. E. Taylor and Charles John Lambert, with myself, went out by rail to Bro. [blank] Despaines at the mouth of Little Cottonwood, to examine the stream at that point, and learn what advantages it presented for the erection of a paper mill. We returned to the city by freight train, twenty minutes to six o’clock, Bro. Despaine having done all in his power to furnish us every facility and also a good dinner

23 April 1881 • Saturday

Saturday, April 23rd Spent the day at the office. Brother Woodruff, who has been sick, was in part of the time. Had some conversation respecting the sale of a lot belonging to Sister Jaques to the Presbyterians, who want it for school purposes. We decided upon what we should do in regard to the matter, and had considerable conversation respecting school affairs. I am deeply impressed with the importance of our devoting attention and means to assist our schools in various parts of our Territory, so as to furnish our young people with every facility for a thorough education, and to make them so attractive and complete that there will be no temptation to attend the schools of our enemies which they are building up in various parts of the territory. I think Prest Taylor is evidently impressed in this direction.

Had some conversation respecting a piece of land belonging to Alfales Young which he offers for sale. It adjoins the Church property, and is a few rods west of the offices.

24 April 1881 • Sunday

Sunday, April 24th The water is still rising at my place, and this morning was so high that my wife Elizabeth, whose health is very poor, became very nervous about it. She told me she could not sleep if it continued to rise. I suggested, then, that she and the younger children go up to the city. I brought herself and Sylvester up in my buggy, and sent Emily in the carriage. Mary Alice preferred staying at home, as she wanted to attend school. There is really no danger, but she is so nervous about water naturally, and her enfeebled condition adds so much to her nervousness that I thought better to have her removed where she would not be affected by it.

I met at the tabernacle with the Saints, and after Bro. John Nicholson had spoken, I addressed the congregation for an hour. Both Bro. Nicholson and myself had good liberty,After the meeting attended council and prayer.

I received a letter of introduction from an old friend of mine, whom I knew in Liverpool, by the name of John Taylor. He is a large ship-owner, at the present time, and resides in London. His ships sail from London to Australia. This letter was dated from Australia, (where he had gone to attend to some business) and introduced Mr. Frankland to me. It was a very kind letter, and full of expressions of friendship.

25 April 1881 • Monday

Monday, April 25th, 1881 At the office all day. I went with my lawyer, Arthur Brown, to see Judge Elias Smith in relation to my contest case, he being one of my witnesses when I was naturalized. Dictated my journal to Bro. John Irvine. Explained to Prest Taylor the examination of Bro. Joseph F. and myself into the manner of disbursing produce, beef, etc. at the Tithing Office, and the plan that had been decided upon as being proper to introduce there in order that we might know how much is disbursed[.] At the present time we can tell how much is received, but we have no means of knowing how much is disbursed, or, in other words, what becomes of that which is paid in as tithing. He approved of the plan, and we decided to carry it out the 1st of May. Elder Orson Pratt was able to call at the office today, which made us all rejoice.

I took dinner between five and six o’clock at Bro. Stephen Marks, who is married to my wife’s niece. Sister Emily H. Little was there also. I drove down late and had to leave my buggy in the lane. The water was so high I dare not cross in the darkness. Brother Brigham Young and others have spoken to me about my living there, and asked me if I did not wish I was out of it. I cannot have that feeling. I have been amply paid, I feel, in the peace that I have had already, notwithstanding the trouble and expense I have been to on my present place, and I believe that it will yet be a very desirable place, though the great difficulty at present is, it is exposed to water when the water rises[.] But when I get down there, I leave strife and trouble behind me. My life for years, past has been one of conflict, and I have been under considerable of a strain when at home, but when I turn my face homeward I have left all this behind. I have had peace in my family, and my children are growing up attached to each other, as brothers and sisters should be, and this is a cause of great happiness to me. Besides, I am absent from the Territory at Washington more than half my time, and when I am in the Territory I spend but a very small portion of my time at home. If I lived in the city my children might form associations over which I would have no control, and they would be exposed to temptations which they are free from at present, and they would be in danger of growing up in idleness; but as I am now situated they learn to work, they grow together, and have their own companionship, and I have my nephew George M. Cannon as school-teacher, so that they have the advantages of a good school. My little son David last fall, when he was only nine years old, milked three cows, and when his mother went up to town, he could hitch up the team and drive her there. My son Lewis, who is only eight years old, also milks two cows. My daughters Mary Alice and Hester have also learned to milk and take pleasure in the work. If they were in the city they would be apt to think this work too menial for them, as this is a feeling too common among girls brought up in the city; so that while there are some disadvantages in my residing out of the city, there are also some advantages.

Bishop Hickenlooper and counselor Watson asked for help to paint the 6th Ward meeting house. One hundred dollars in Z. C. M. I. and Seventy-five dollars in labor tithing.

26 April 1881 • Tuesday

Tuesday, April 26th, 1881 At the office all day. There was a meeting of the Gas Company this morning, and they resolved to put the price of gas down to $3.00 per thousand cubic feet. There was considerable conversation respecting the electric light. It has already secured the patronage of all the stores, and to all appearance it will reduce the income of the Gas Company very considerably[.]

Took Bro. Dusenberry down to my house. He stayed with me all night.

27 April 1881 • Wednesday

Wednesday, April 27th, 1881 At the Office. Bro. Alonzo Colton, who was unjustly sentenced by Judge Boreman to the penitentiary for five years for lascivious cohabitation because he had two wives, and this after this law against this crime had been repealed, called at the office, he having been released. He had served out his time after that gained by good behaviour had been allowed; his imprisonment had been for longer than four years. We voted fifty dollars to help him. Bro. W. J. Silver was directed to examine into the safety of the present hoisting apparatus for the stone of the temple. Bro. F. D. Richards came down from Ogden. In the afternoon attended council, after which took dinner with my adopted daughter Rosa Lambert, in company with my wife Elizabeth

28 April 1881 • Thursday

Thursday, April 28th At the office all day. We have some cases of adultery brought before us, which were very painful. The misery that people suffer who do wrong ought to be a warning to everyone to avoid sin. The Latter-day Saints who transgress the Laws Of God in respect to virtue begin to suffer a foretaste of the torments of hell, I should judge, by the spirit they manifest. It is difficult to decide upon any general rule to apply to such cases. Each case has its peculiar features and must be decided by the spirit at the time it comes up. Prest Taylor and myself called at Bro. D. O. Calder’s, in company with John T. Caine to listen to and examine a Chickering piano for the Theater, which that firm had sent on for that place at a low figure. It was decided to buy it.

I remained in town all night with my wife at her sister Emily’s. Went in evening to hear the lecture of Mr. Archibald Forbes, the famous war correspondent. His subject “Royal personages whom I have met.” The lecture was well written, but he is not a good reader. He delivered it standing sitting, ill health and lameness preventing his standing up

29 April 1881 • Friday

Friday, April 29th, 1881 I drove down to my place this morning. Attended to business preparatory to going to Logan this afternoon to attend conference. My contest case is on hand, it now being the time for Campbell to take testimony. Before deciding to leave the city I saw my attorney, Arthur Brown, to know whether I could safely go. He learned from McBride, the lawyer, that they would not commence till next Monday, and that I could go safely. Yesterday I corrected a circular letter which we signed today addressed to the Presiding Bishop and his counsellors and the brethren who had charge of the Tithing Storehouse, respecting the disbursement of tithing hereafter. Personally I am very desirous to have such measures taken as will lift our tithing pay out of its present repute and make it next thing to cash. There is no good reason why the Church tithing office should not be a first-class institution and have the best of credit. As it is, people feel towards the tithing office as if it were a place for alms to be distributed and where pay can only be obtained by begging. Tithing office orders are hawked about at a very great discount, and the condition is painful to those who take pride in Church institutions. One difficulty I imagine is that we employ more people than our income warrants us in doing.

Wrote and telegraphed to Mr. Landers of the Palace Hotel San Francisco. At 3:40 Friday, Ap started with my wife Elizabeth in company with Brother Joseph F. Smith and wife, Brigham Young, John Smith, George F. Gibbs, and Sisters Juliet Pratt and Mary Ann Reynolds. Prest Taylor and wife and daughter Ida, also Brother George Reynolds had gone to Ogden on the morning train, and Prest Woodruff had preceded us the day before, having gone to Smith field. While travelling to Ogden, I dictated an Editorial for the Juvenile to Brother Gibbs, who took it in shorthand, transcribed it and sent it back by the next train from Ogden to Bro. Geo C. Lambert. Brother Smith and wife, Brother Young, myself and wife took dinner at the railroad eating house. A special car was assigned us by Supt. Geo. W. Thatcher to make the trip to Logan, but Prest Taylor arranged with the Agent for seats in the sleeper for the ladies, and I availed myself of his courtesy. We were detained in Ogden sometime, the Union Pacific train being behind, consequently it was one o’clock a m when we arrived at Logan. We were met there by Prests Preston and Chas O. Card with teams. Myself and wife were assigned to Bro Card’s as our stopping place.

30 April 1881 • Saturday

Saturday, Sep. <Ap?> [April] 30th 1881 Arose early and did some work on my “life of Nephi”. At ten o’clock we went to the tabernacle. The statistical report was read by the clerk, Bro. Leishman. Bishop Woolley, who had come up from the city on a visit, was the first speaker. Afterwards the following named Bishops represented their wards: Jardive, Maughan, Liljinguest, Hyde, Daines, Davidson and Skidmore. Bp. Petkin gave a report of his recent mission to the Southern States, and President Taylor made some closing remarks. There was a tolerably good attendance, considering it was Saturday. Bro. Card arranged to carry us to and from the meeting in his carriage, which was a great convenience for my wife, her health being very poor.

The afternoon meeting was occupied by Prest Woodruff and Elders Richards and Snow. There was one interesting fact connected with the statistical report of this Stake[.] There are 15,042 souls in the Church in the Stake. There are 1497 Elders. If there were 45 elders more, every tenth person would be an Elder. There are 2288 persons holding the priesthood, about two out of every thirteen souls. There are 3436 persons who hold the greater and the lesser priesthoods[.] This is more than two out of every nine. Through the kindness of the brethren we had an opportunity of visiting the temple. Although my wife’s health was very poor, she succeeded in reaching the upper platform on the top of the walls. The view was very magnificent. Most of the heavy timbers of the roof are in their place, and the rock work nearly completed, the upper layer consisting of white sandstone being now in progress. It is certainly a magnificent building. Its solidity impresses one.

It has been decided to paint it instead of plastering it. The stone is dark, but we all feel, although it may not appear so pleasant to the eye as if it were white, that it will be better to have the walls appear natural, than to have them covered with plaster, and that time will mellow and add to its appearance. At seven o’clock I attended a council at Prest Preston’s where Prest Taylor was stopping, and we took into consideration the question of holding meetings in the various settlements. (I omitted to mention that when we left Ogden we were accompanied by Elder F. D. Richards and wife, and Richard J. Taylor, and at noon today we were joined by Bro Lorenzo Snow from Brigham City[.]) The following programme of travel was decided upon: The First Presidency and Prest Woodruff, accompanied by Patriarch John Smith, George Reynolds, Richard J. Taylor, Prest Preston and Geo. F. Gibbs should hold meetings in the following-named settlements lying north: Hyde Park at seven o’clock Sunday evening; Smithfield 10 o’clock Monday morning, Richmond seven o’clock Monday evening; Franklin 11 o’clock Tuesday morning, Mendon seven o’clock same evening. While Elders Snow, Richards and Young shall visit the following settlements lying south: Providence Sunday evening seven o’clock, Millville 10 O’clock Monday morning, Paradise 7 o’clock same evening, Hyrum 10 o’clock Tuesday, Wellsville 2 o’clock in the afternoon, Mendon in the evening. It was also decided that Elders Snow and Young accompanied by Prest Preston, should visit the settlements on the west and north of Bear River.

Cash Account – January.

Date.

T. in T.

I Received.

I Paid.

1880

Nov.29

By cash pr. Jas. Jack

500

00

Dec.4

″ tithing on salary

41

60

″ ″

″ ″ ″ mileage

96

00

To cash (capital) pr.

Douglas

150

00

″ ″ Parrish doc’s

24

00

1881

Jan. 4

By tithing on salary

41

70

1

″ ″ ″ U. C. R. R.

120

00

1

″ ″ ″ coupons

14

00

Dec. 1 <1880>

″ ″ ″ St. R. R. divi.

10

00

Jan. 28

To Frank M. Morgan

20

00

Feb. 1

″ copyright of Temple

1

00

4

By tithing on salary

41

70

12

To bal. on Mrs. Godbe’s hotel bill

14

00

″ Omaha Herald

6

00

Mar. 3

″ Louisville Post

50

00

By tithing

41

60

″ ″ stationery

12

50

″ ″ salary

00

00

To Louisville Post

00

00

″ Judge Dusenberry

25

00

″ ″ ″

125

00

″ meals &c.

9

00

919

10

424

00

Cash Account – January.

Date.

Received.

Paid.

919

10

424

00

Apr.11

To cash paid as tithing to T. in T.

458

45

15

By tithing on salary

41

70

″ ″ fees from estate

10

00

″ ″ U C. dividend

120

00

To cash pd. as tithing

132

35

Cash Account – March.

Date.

I Received.

I Paid.

1880

Sergeant-at-Arms

Dec. 4

By salary

416

00

″ mileage

960

00

7

″ cash from home

250

00

To ″

50

00

″ check (G. M. C’s salary & Assembly Hall

80

00

″ Henry’s board

15

00

″ Z. C. M. I.

400

00

″ Hoagland Estate

383

16

″ Capital (pr. Douglas)

150

00

″ Parrish (doc’s.)

24

00

″ Hotel (H. B. C.)

26

00

Dec. 31

″ Room rent, &c

60

00

1881

Jan.5

″ Draft to pay wages &c

107

50

14

″ Cash

40

00

″ 4

By salary

417

00

15

To G. M. C’s salary

32

00

22

″ Gen. H. E Paine,

attorney

300

00

27

″ Arthur Brown ″

50

00

29

″ Draft for Dan’s wages

30

00

Feb. 1

″ ″ ″ Board

37

50

Jan. 31

″ Cash

25

00

Feb.4

″ Room rent, &c

60

00

By salary

417

00

1870

16

2460

00

Cash Account – March.

Date.

I Received.

I Paid.

1870

16

2460

00

Feb. 5

To cash (Gen. Paine)

200

00

″ Reporting & machine printng

30

50

″ Speeches

13

95

7

″ cash

20

00

12

″ Mrs. Godbe’s <Hotel> bill

14

00

11

″ Omaha Herald

6

00

17

″ S. W. Downey (loan)

100

00

″ G. M. Cannon’s salary

36

00

19

″ cash

20

00

21

″ ″

50

00

23

″ ″ Judge Dusenberry

25

00

″ ″

10

00

″ Draft to pay Dan

30

00

″ ″ Louisville Post

50

00

By cash Judge Dusenberry

500

00

″ stationery a/c

87

53

Mar. 4

″ salary

416

00

To loan (G.M.A.)

500

00

By cash

80

00

Mar. 4

To ″

60

00

12

″ ″ pay copyist

10

00

″ ″

497

92

3543

53

3543

53