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June 1879


1 June 1879 • Sunday

Reading the most of the day. Hottest day, I think, of the season thus far.

2 June 1879 • Monday

Another hot day. At the House. In Congressional Library

3 June 1879 • Tuesday

At the House. Heard a speech from Hon. S. S. Cox and then adjourned. I went into Library till Caucus met. More harmony than usual. A joint committee had prepared the vetoed Bills in a new shape. After discussion they were adopted by the Caucus. Had conversation as I walked to my hotel with Major Maginnis of Montana respecting the admission of Utah. For particulars see letter to Pres. Taylor of to-morrow’s date.

4 June 1879 • Wednesday

At the House. Various bills acted upon. After adjournment spent some time in Cong. Library. Met in morning with the Com. on Ter. The chairman, Mr. Muldrow, spoke about Gen. Bouck and he coming out to Utah to see us with a view to admission. I told them I should be glad to see them and would try and make their stay <there> pleasant to them. Wrote to Pres. Taylor, which see. Called at Mr. Reed’s. Spent the evening out of doors conversing. Mrs. Reed and a Mrs. Walbridge were there a part of the time.

5 June 1879 • Thursday

Called upon Pres. Hayes with the affidavits and petitions (the latter signed by 29,310 men and women) in the case of Bro. Geo. Reynolds, and asking for the remission of his sentence. He said they deserved attention and he would examine them. He had read the petition before making this remark. I said that I should accept his favorable action in the case as a favor to me personally, as I had helped get Mr. Reynolds to consent to make his case a test one.

At the House; but little done. I was in Cong. Library.

Wrote to Uncle Taylor and to my brother Angus.

Busy all evening selecting texts for Sunday Schools tickets of rewards.

6 June 1879 • Friday

At the House.

Discussing Letter Carrier’s Bill.

Some time in the Cong. Library.

In evening writing home to my wife Martha and <my> daughter Hester in response to their letters. The latter’s letter surprised me it was so well written. She was 9 years old last February.

7 June 1879 • Saturday

At the House. Discussion the same as yesterday. In the Cong. Library. Wrote to my wives, and sent letters under cover to my brother Angus.

Working at scripture texts in the evening.

8 June 1879 • Sunday

Reading.

Professor J. Adams Congdon, a noted teacher on elocution, to whom I had loaned “Spencer’s Letters” and my Review of the Decision of the U. S. Supreme court in the Reynolds’ case, called upon and spent the evening. Our conversation was principally upon “Mormonism.” These books had enlightened him. He spoke in high terms of my Review. He is a lawyer by profession. Numbers of Members of the House have endorsed the Review and thought it exhaustive, correct and an able presentation of the case. Among others Hurd and Finley of Ohio, Culberson of Texas, Cook of Ga., Aiken Tillman and Evins of S. C., Armfield of N. C., Beale of Va. Some of these asked me for copies to send to friends. Many others have read and spoken highly of it whose names I do not mention. My desire in writing and printing it was to do good.

9 June 1879 • Monday

At the House. Call of the States and Territories for Bills and Joint Resolutions. Then passed several Bills under the suspension of the Rules, among others the Legislative and Executive Appropriation Bill. Worked in evening at selecting texts from Scripture.

10 June 1879 • Tuesday

At the House. Passed the Judicial Appropriation Bill. In Congressional Library. Preparing scripture texts.

11 June 1879 • Wednesday

Called upon Pres. Hayes with 708 signers to a petition for Bro. Reynold’s pardon. This makes 30,018 names. He said he had not examined the case yet. I pressed its importance upon him. Called upon 2nd Auditor upon business. At the House. Army Appropriation Bill passed. Received a letter from my nephew Geo. C. Lambert in which he says, [that my son Frank was hanging out with unrighteous people and was dissipated. This is very troubling to me because I have taught my children to do right and to flee from all evil influences. They know that it is wrong to drink alcohol and do anything like that. One thing that is clear to me is that it is not necessary for me to overburden myself with the transgressions of my children. They will stand before the Lord, being accountable for themselves. If they do works of righteousness, then that will be good for them. If they do works of iniquity, then they will receive their punishment.]1

12 June 1879 • Thursday

Thursday, 12th

I sent a dispatch to my brother Angus upon the above subject and told him to take the matter in hand for me immediately. I also wrote to him; also to my brother David. I had sent $100 in a draft to David which I was owing him. The letter did not reach him, it was burned probably at Silver Reef. I had to give an indemnifying bond for the amount to get another draft. Mr. Ainslie of Idaho and Mr. Frank H. Hurd of Ohio without solicitation upon my part offered to be my sureties.

At the House. Passed the Army Bill. Received a dispatch from Uncle Taylor saying Reynolds would be re-sentenced on Saturday & asking what is the outlook about the petitions.

13 June 1879 • Friday

I replied to the dispatch last night. I drew up a strong letter upon the Reynolds’ case to President Hayes (see copy) and had it sworn to. I called upon Gen. Garfield and submitted it to him and asked him to go with it to the President. He told me he would see Mr. Hayes to-day upon the subject, but did not like to present any papers. I went to Mr. Hayes with it myself. He read it carefully and said the case deserved consideration and ought to be attended to and he would submit it to the Attorney General to-day. I called upon the latter also and appealed to him to do all in his power in the case.

Had a call from Gilbert Wilkes, a Cadet at the Naval Academy, whom I appointed. He is a promising young fellow and expresses gratitude to me for the appointment.

14 June 1879 • Saturday

Called at the Dep’t. of Justice and at the White House. (See my letter to Pres. Taylor of this date for particulars)

At the House. Very little business done.

Received a dispatch from Pres. Taylor this evening, informing me that Bro. Reynolds had been re-sentenced and would be taken out of the Ter. to prison on Monday morning, and asking if he could not remain till President Hayes had decided respecting a pardon. Call upon Mr. John Sherman, Sec. of Treasury, Mr. Evarts, Sec. of State, and Mr. Key, Postmaster Gen. and found them not. They were all out.

15 June 1879 • Sunday

Called upon the three members of the Cabinet whom I tried to see last night. For particulars of interviews see my letter to Pres. Taylor of to-day’s date.

A hot day.

16 June 1879 • Monday

Called at the Dep’t of Justice. Attorney-General is absent.

Called upon the President Hayes this morning and showed him the telegram. He kept it and said he would decide. I could learn the decision through the papers. It is evident that it is a foregone conclusion that Bro. Reynolds must go to prison. I said all I could to him. Before calling upon him I saw Sec. Sherman. He referred me to Mr. Hayes. I eviden saw by his manner that no favorable result had attended his interposition. He said that he did not like to say very much in a case of this kind that came under another Dep’t.

At the House.

17 June 1879 • Tuesday

Called at the Dep’t of Justice. At the House. Received telegram from Bro. Staines about attending Meeting of Board of Trade at New York to prepare for World’s Fair there in 1883. He and I had been appointed Delegates to represent Salt Lake City. After weighing matter carefully I concluded I could not leave here in safety and so telegraphed him.

Received a dispatch this evening from Pres. Taylor asking if Reynolds could not be returned to the Penitentiary at Salt Lake if they would bear the expense.

18 June 1879 • Wednesday

Called at the Dep’t. of Justice <Attorney General was absent.> and then at the White House. Had a more interesting interview with Mr. Hayes than usual. For particulars see letter which I wrote to Pres. Taylor. Wrote to my wife Elizabeth and my daughter Mary Alice.

At the House; but very little was done except talking.

Replied this morning to Pres. Taylor’s dispatch. I said Devens absent. Seen President again upon subject of your dispatch. Cannot answer till Friday.

Attended <meeting of> Committee on Ter. this morning. No quorum.

19 June 1879 • Thursday

Wrote several letters, one to J H Foy of Richmond, Onslow Co., N. C. who wrote me asking questions about Utah. He is evidently very friendly, and will be a candidate for the Legislature and if elected he hopes to be able to use an influence in our behalf. The proceedings in the all night session of the Senate were scandalous. (See Record)

At the House; but little business done.

20 June 1879 • Friday

Called at the Dep’t of Justice and saw Mr. Chase. I talked over with him respecting the transfer of Bro. Reynolds from Detroit to Utah. He promised to use his influence with the Attorney-General and arranged to meet me at the Riggs House at 11 a.m. For particulars of this see letter to Pres. John Taylor of this date. He told me a number of items about Marshal Shaughnessy who is [from] New York. He has been appointed one of the Receivers of the estate of Pres. B. Young in the suit started by Emeline Young MacIntosh against the Executors and was going to employ Gen. B. F. Butler as Counsel; but he recommended him to employ Wm O Bartlett. He did so. He talked very freely and said we, the Executors, should arrange with this woman and I should go to N. Y. and see Shaughnessy. He thought the matter might be arranged. I telegraphed in cipher to the Executors at Salt Lake City – Bro’s, Young and Carrington.

21 June 1879 • Saturday

Saturday, 21.

At the House. Telegraphed to Bro. Webber about my loan with Goldberg and gave him the authority to sell bonds or do the best he could as I probably would not be back for the first. No business of importance in the House to-day.

Christy, deputy serjeant-at-arms of the Senate had been requested by Geo. Otis of N. Y. to find out the names of my attorneys.

22 June 1879 • Sunday

Learned from our home papers that Bro. Reynolds had gone to Lincoln, Neb., instead of Detroit. Saw Mr. Chase again. He called upon me. He renewed the conversation of Friday. He evidently desired to be ko’u loio [my lawyer] and I proposed to him [that I would hire him. He said that he could do many things to help us, but he wanted me not to tell others. He said to keep this matter secret, for if it were revealed to the public, he would lose his influence and his ability to assist us. I asked him the amount of the payment. He did not want to speak about it at this time; rather, he said that at another time the two of us could discuss this matter.]2 He gave me a clue to the inquiry respecting my attorneys. He said Shaugnessy was being watched by some men. He thought they were put on his track by the Church and he wanted to know my lawyers so as to communicate with them about it.

23 June 1879 • Monday

Wrote a letter to the Attorney-General asking him to have Geo. Reynolds returned from Lincoln, Neb., to Utah (see <copy of> letter)[.] He told Mr. Chase to send an order to that effect.

At the P. O. Dept. Got service increased upon Route from Green River to Uintah from weekly to tri-weekly; also from Fillmore to Deseret to semi-weekly.

Wrote letter to Pres. John Taylor, which see.

Also yesterday to Bro. Webber and my son John Q.

24 June 1879 • Tuesday

Wrote several letters. Hot day. Met at the House. But little done. Received letters from Gen. Kane in which he informed me he had given a letter of introduction to Capt. Green, acting Pres. of the Penn. Central R.R. Co. for the purpose of introducing the subject of transporting our emigrants by their line of steamships. The General expressed a wish that I should meet him at Philadelphia, and if I concluded to do so to telegraph him and to be there on Thursday.

Wrote a number of letters.

25 June 1879 • Wednesday

I telegraphed Gen. Kane that I would be up there to-night. At the House. Nothing of importance done. Took cars for Philadelphia at 5.30 p.m. reached there at about 11 p.m. Put up at the Continental Hotel.

26–27 June 1879 • Thursday–Friday

After breakfast called upon the General at the Washington Hotel. Had a delightful meeting. We called together upon Capt Green at the Office of the Penn. <Central> R.R. Co. The conversation was upon the subject of bringing our emigration by the Steam ship line. They thought they could carry them cheaper than they were being carried at present. He sent for Mr. [blank] the Agent who had that branch in charge. They wanted their offer fairly considered which they thought had not been done previously, then if we decided against them, they would be content. I promised them that their proposition should be laid before Pres. Taylor & be fairly considered by him and Council. I agreed to meet the General at 2 p.m. in the meantime I called upon Mr. G. W Biddle and Mr. Harry Clay, both of whom were glad to see me. The General and I went out to the Schuylkill and took a little steamer and ran up to Strawberry Hill, where we had an excellent dinner of clams, raw, stewed & fried. Then we went to Laurel Hill Cemetry and we visited the family grave of the General in which his parents and Grandparents and some of his great grand parents are buried. It is hewn out of stone on the point of a peninsula and the entrance is of three massive granite blocks two uprights and a cap or lintel. The door is of massive iron. The space around is considerable, the General having the title to it. The spot is a romantic one. From there we went up the river to Wissahickon and then back to Fairmount where we took <horse> cars for the city. The day has been very hot and we did considerable walking. I felt very tired; but the scenery is very beautiful. The ride on the river most charming, and altogether we had a most delightful day together. The General would not suffer me to pay for anything. He called it a junketing trip and we both wished we had our children with us. Before starting I called at his hotel and bade him goodbye. He is a dear friend and if I were his brother in the flesh he could not feel and act more warmly towards me. I left at 1.05 a.m. for Washington. Reached there at 6.30 a.m. on

Friday, the 27th

The sad anniversary of the martyrdom of Bro’s. Joseph and Hyrum Smith. Thirty-five years have passed away, and oh, how quickly to me! At the House. Received a letter from my wife Elizabeth.

28 June 1879 • Saturday

Saturday, the 28th

The House having passed a resolution to adjourn on Monday it struck me that perhaps I could start home this evening in safety and by so doing reach there on the evening of the 3rd to spend the fourth as a holiday with my family. I spoke to the Speaker about it & he said I ought to go and he would watch for me that nothing injurious to us was <should be> allowed to come in. I saw Mr. Atkins, Gen. Hawley and others; all of whom thought it quite safe for me to go. I then telegraphed Pres. Taylor that I thought of returning, and I secured my berth on the sleeping car. In order that I might know what to say to the folks about Bro. Reynolds’ case I concluded to call upon Mr. Hayes. He said that to talk frankly this practice among us must stop. The country demanded it. He could hold out no hopes about extending clemency to Bro. Reynolds. The law must be enforced in such cases. He related a Mr. Lincoln’s action in the case of Mr. Vallandigham, who had been sent through the lines at the time of the war. A delegation of eminent citizens of Ohio waited upon Pres. Lincoln to solicit pardon for Vallandigham. He told them if they would give a pledge in writing to support the policy of the government and to aid it in the war it was waging, he would pardon him. This, Hayes said, they declined to do. If, said he, the leading men among the Mormons would give a pledge that this practice would cease, then clemency would be extended—the intimation, as I understood it, was that unless this were done we might ask in vain for pardon, or clemency. In our conversation a few days ago I told him that no pledge would be given. I said to him to-day that we must trust in the Lord and in His providence it would be overruled for good. In this he acquiesced. He said: I wish you well and I wish your people well. I said to him that we had proved in the past our willingness to suffer for our religion. That spirit still prevailed. Let the people be convinced, said I, that their marriages are wrong and they will not marry. They have strong & profound convictions and cannot abandon what they conceive to be right at the bidding of any man. He replied that he could not help admiring sincerity in a people and the disposition to abide by one’s convictions. It is evident, as I have been told by a Mr. Chase of the Dep’t. of Justice, that this Administration would have been severe with us had it not had its hands full; and that the intention is cherished of punishing us for our non-obedience to the law of 1862. Well, all I can say is: The Lord and the Administration will try conclusions and the world will see whether there is a power greater than the great American nation. The Lord has made promises and we shall see whether Mr. Hayes and his Cabinet can prevent their fulfilment. About this I feel exceedingly easy. I know the Lord’s power to fulfil, and because it does is not exhibited as man’s is, it is none the less potent.

He told me that it was his present intention to call another session after vetoing the bill appropriating money for the pay of Marshals, if Congress adjourned without passing it in the shape he thought it ought to be in. I concluded, this being the case, not to go. Pres. Taylor telegraphed to me in reply to mine: “all right. Come.” But this came too late to admit of my going to-night even if I had not given up the idea.

I wrote to my wife Elizabeth this evening in reply to hers. A very hot day.

29 June 1879 • Sunday

Sunday, June 29th

Busy arranging texts from Doctrine & Covenants for Sunday Schools. Selected and arranged about 200.

Very hot until middle of the afternoon.

30 June 1879 • Monday

Monday, June 30th

At the House. A veto message and another message from the President (Mr. Hayes)[.] The Democrats of the Senate tried to get up the Resolution to adjourn at 4 p.m. to-day; but Windom for the Republicans objected. Closing up my business, writing letters &c. Called upon Mrs. Ketcham and sister

Cash Account – June.

Date.

Sarjeant-at-Arms

I

Received.

I

Paid.

1878

Dec

By Cash

850

00

″ 4

Salary

416

00

Mileage

960

00

5

To Cash

25

00

13

″ ″

40

00

17

″ ″

50

00

″ ″

217

25

19

″ ″

1000

00

″ ″

284

75

1879

Jan. 4

Salary

417

00

8

″ Cash

10

00

9

By ″

200

00

To ″

200

00

″ ″

100

00

11

″ ″

25

00

13

″ ″

25

00

15

″ ″

30

00

18

″ ″

30

00

21

″ ″

20

00

24

″ ″

25

00

″ ″

25

00

29

″ ″

300

00

2407

00

2843

00

Cash Account – June.

Date.

Received.

Paid.

2407

00

2843

00

1879

Jan. 29

To cash

14

00

″ ″

100

00

30

″ ″

100

00

28

″ ″

52

00

Feb. 4

By salary

417

00

6

To cash

40

00

10

″ ″

20

00

13

″ ″

320

70

17

″ ″

20

00

23

″ ″

120

00

24

″ ″

31

00

25

″ ″

20

00

Mar. 1

″ ″

15

30

4

By ″

86

96

″ salary

417

00

To cash

200

00

7

″ ″

85

00

″ ″

35

00

″ ″

35

00

22

″ ″

60

00

″ ″

28

75

27

″ ″

110

21

Apl. 4

By salary

417

00

3813

96

4180

96

Footnotes

  1. [1]Translated from Hawaiian: ka’u keiki kane o Frank e hele pu ana oia me na kanaka pono ole a ua “dissipated” ia. He mea kaumahi keia ia’u; no ka mea, ua ao aku <au> i Ka’u mau Keiki e hana i ka pono a e haalele ina mea ino a pau loa. Ua ike lakou he mea ino ia e inu rama, a me na mea like a pau loa. Eia Kekahi mea Akaka ia’u, aole pono no’u e hookaumaha ia’u iho me na hewa o Ka’u mau keiki. Ke ku nei lakou imua o ke Akua no lakou iho. Ina pono ka lakou hana, he mea maikai ia no lakou; ina hewa ka lakou hana, maluna iho o lakou e hiki mai ka hookewaia.

  2. [2]Translated from Hawaiian: e hoolimalima au ia ia. Ua i mai ua hiki ia ia e hana i na mea he nui e kokua ia ka kou. Aka ua makemake oia e hai ole au, pono loa, i mai la oia e hoohuna iho ia mea no ka mea, ina ua ikeia e na kanaka pau kona mana e kokua ia kakou. Ua ninau au ia ia <no> ka nui o ka uku. Aole oia makemake e olelo no ia mea ia Manawa. O kekahi Manawa e, wahi ana, <ia> e hiki ia maua e olelo pu no ia mea.