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December 1876


1 December 1876 • Friday

The thermometer was reported to us at being -14°. We reached Chicago at 3.40 and as there was no through car for Washington until 10.20 we concluded to wait for that. We went to the Grand Pacific Hotel. Met several members of Congress who were also going to Washington this evening. We found ourselves on the train in company with Senators Logan, of Illinois, Ingalls, of Kansas, and Cameron, of Wisconsin; Representatives Rusk, of Wisconsin, Henderson, Anderson, Whiting and Stevenson of Illinois, Sampson and McCrary of Iowa, Strait, of Minnesota, and Delegates McGinnis of Montana, and Patterson of Colorado. Mrs. Silva, wife of the late receiver of the Land Office in Salt Lake, also was on the car; she has traveled with us all the way from Salt Lake City.

2 December 1876 • Saturday

A cloudy, rather stormy day.

3 December 1876 • Sunday

We reached Washington at 9.12 a.m. and went to Willard’s Hotel. Wrote letters home to my family, also to Pres’t. Young.

4 December 1876 • Monday

The House met at 12 o’clock. There were very cordial greetings among the members. Mr. Randall was elected Speaker. Considerable discussion was had over the admission of the newly elected member from Colorado. His credentials ca were referred to the Com. on Judiciary. The Democrats carried a resolution through, with considerable opposition from the Republicans appointing a Com. of 15 to investigate Louisiana, a com. of 9 for South Carolina and one of 6 for Florida, to investigate the elections in those States. The session held until 7.30, and there was every appearance at one time that we might be in session all night.

When Mr. Randall made his speech upon taking the Speaker’s Chair, he concluded with the announcement that we have a “country to save which may be lost if unauthorized and unconstitutional acts of executive officers be not frowned down at once with relentless and unsparing condemnation. This was received with great applause by the Democratic side of the House, and produced a decided sensation. Thus has opened the 2nd Session of the 44th Congress a session which promises to be one of the most eventful in American history. Everyone appears to feel the gravity of the circumstances which surround us as a nation, and that we are on the very verge of trouble, that may, unless great prudence and self-denial be exercised, result in civil war, and civil war of the most dreadful character

5 December 1876 • Tuesday

Tuesday 5.

Received a note from Mrs. Ritchie, giving me her address. Jno. Q and myself called upon her with the present Mary Alice had sent to Blanche. She had a suite of rooms to rent which I think will answer our purpose though they are not furnished quite as I would like to have them. Still I have no doubt it will be a charity to take them from her. She offers them for $60.00 a month. The bed room is not connected with the sitting room though on the same floor. There is a bath room of which we can have the use.

Considerable excitement was created this morning by Gen. Plaisted of Maine rising to a question of privilege upon the vote for suspending the rules to pass the resolution for the appointment of committees to Louisiana, South Carolina and Florida. He had been recorded as being absent. He declared that he was present and had voted in the negative. As the rules were suspended by a bare two-thirds majority, the recording of his vote would change the result, and defeat the resolution. Considerable argument was had pro and con Mr. Holman maintaining that the journal could not be altered except by unanimous consent, stating that whenever allusions had been made it had been by unanimous consent. The Speaker, however, decided that the Journal should be corrected and it was corrected much to the joy of the Republicans, who supposed that the resolution was defeated. But to their astonishment, Mr. Fuller, of Indiana, came forward and stated that he had voted in the affirmative yesterday and his vote was not recorded. The journal was altered to admit his vote; but this still left one vote lacking to pass the resolution, when Mr. Randall stated that had the journal been properly reported yesterday it would have shown that one vote was necessary to pass the resolution, and in such an event he undoubtedly would have exercised his constitutional privilege and voted for it, and he asked the unanimous consent of the House to do so now, and he did so though the Republicans yielded to it with a very bad grace.

6 December 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday 6

Went to the P. O. dept with a petition from miners in the vicinity of Leeds, Washington Co., Utah, asking for the establishment of a P. O. Mr. Marshall, the 1st Ass’t P. M. General thought that the establishment of a new office at the point desired could not be granted because a rule of the Dept. is that no office shall be established within three miles of another except in very thickly populated regions. There was not much excitement in the House until a special message was rec’d from the president forwarding a long communication, signed by Senator Jno. Sherman and others whom he had selected to go to Louisiana and witness the counting of the votes, giving a detailed account of outrages committed by the Democrats to intimidate the negroes, and to furnish a justification for throwing out the vote of several parishes, thus reducing the Democratic majority and giving the state to Hayes and Wheeler. Fernando Wood of New York made an indignant speech against the message as being an insult to the House of Representatives. The documents were laid on the table by a strict party vote. A democratic caucus was called immediately after the session. Several members expressed themselves upon the gravity of the situation, and thought it was time some action were taken to resist the encroachments of the executive, especially to condemn his action in sending troops to South Carolina. A resolution was prepared by Mr. Fernando Wood and read to the caucus which proposed an examination into the sending of the troops there and in the event of there being sufficient cause for impeachment, for the judiciary committee to bring in articles to impeach Prest. Grant. This and all resolutions of the same character the caucus decided should be sent to a Committee of 7, whom the Chairman, Mr. Lamar, of Miss. appointed. Abram S. Hewitt was made Chairman and the other members were all from Northern States. At these meetings I am always impressed with the difference <between the mode> of doing business here and our method at home. The absence of union here is plainly apparent, and no party it seems to me can accomplish any very great results who are so divided. Every man thinks his opinion as good as his neighbor’s, and there is an absence of any disposition to recognize leadership. The result is a great variety of plans and confusion. Mr. Randall, the Speaker, seems deeply impressed with the gravity of the situation. I was told to-day by Mrs. Kimball of Philadelphia, who, with her husband has been in our country, that Mr. Randall was very reluctant to take the Speakership. He said it might cost him his head before the Congress ended. There is no disguising the fact that we are on the eve of great events, and it will be most extraordinary to me if we do not have a conflict growing out of these difficulties.

7 December 1876 • Thursday

Thursday 7

Called at the Treasury Dep’t; had an interview with Col. Tayler 1st Comptroller respecting the preparation <appropriation> of $4000. which I had passed through Congress at its last session, to aid in the compilation and publication of the laws of Utah. I found that the Governor and Secretary had not got any of the money. Called at the Land Office on some business. The House did very little to-day after the morning hour. A caucus of the Democratic members was held on the propriety of introducing a resolution to examine into Pres’t. Grant’s interference through the military in South Carolina Florida and Louisiana was discussed. It was finally decided not to introduce the resolution at present Southern men evinced their determination to do nothing that could be construed into an attempt on their part to impeach Pres’t. Grant. They argued that if anything of this kind were done it would arouse the loyal sentiment of the North, as the Republicans would seek in every possible way to inflame the people with the idea that the Confederate House of Representatives was determined to destroy the “Savior of his country,” who had beaten them so signally on the battlefield. it is very evident that the South is determined not to take the initiative in any action at the present crisis. If northern Democrats can submit to wrong, they feel that they can far better, for they have learned to suffer with patience through the years of oppression to which they have been subjected.

8 December 1876 • Friday

Friday 8

At General Land Office attending to business. The House was in session and passed the pension bill appropriating upwards of $28,000,000 with little or no discussion. After the morning hour motion was made that when the House adjourned it should adjourn to meet on Monday next, and immediately afterwards it adjourned. It had been my intention to go down to Annapolis and see Feramorz L. Young, son of the President’s, who is a cadet midshipman at the Academy there; but i saw by the Baltimore papers that he had resigned yesterday and started for home. The naval profession was distasteful to him. Wrote letters to Bro’s. Smoot, Burton and Smith in reply to theirs upon the subject of the $4000.00 appropriation to help publish the laws; also a letter to President Young at St. George, and some correspondence with the departments.

9 December 1876 • Saturday

Saturday 9

Attending to some business at the departments. The day was a very cold one.

10 December 1876 • Sunday

Sunday 10

The morning was very cold. We met as usual and attended to prayer according to the order, which we have done since we moved to our new quarters, on Friday. I spent the day in the House, going out only for dinner. Dictated some editorials for the Juvenile, also a letter to Abraham. I wrote a letter to my wife Elizabeth. The day was suggestive of many tender recollections it being 22 years since we were united as husband and wife. I can scarcely conceive that so long a period has elapsed. The trials and vexations of that period, are all forgotten and completely effaced by the recollection of the great happiness that I have enjoyed. My life since that period has been an exceedingly happy one.

11 December 1876 • Monday

Monday 11

Had an interview this morning with the 1st Comptroller of the Treasury on the subject of the printing and compilation of the laws. He had been informed by. Gov. Emery that the cost of the work was $3.55 per vol. I had telegraphed to Gen. Burton, and learned that it would be at least $3.80 per vol. Saw the 3rd Auditor of the Treasury respecting Dabrowski claim, and left with him evidences of identity, letters of administration, and the power of attorney authorizing me to collect the amount due. Was not much business done in the House. Call was made by States and Territories and several resolutions were offered. A democratic caucus was held after the House adjourned at which there was a very full attendance. There was some very plain talk as to what should be done. Some of the members, at least, are working themselves up to the proper condition of feeling to resist what they may consider wrong on the part of Grant. The general feeling, however, is one of apathy. According to my judgment members do not arise to the greatness of the occasion, neither do they seem to be conscious of the imminency of the peril. Mr. Randall said in his remarks, which were very spirited, that it had been told him that Grant had said if the House proved refractory he would put them in Fortress Monroe. He seems to be of the opinion that he is capable of doing any thing that may be necessary to advance his own interest, and to bolster up his party. The committee of 10 appointed by the chairman of the caucus to take into consideration all matters connected with the presidential election, are preparing an address to the people of the United States. Associated with them are 5 lawyers, <leading> Democratic Senators, good, sound, lawyers. I still am convinced that everything is being done and will be done to make the inauguration of Gov. Hayes a success. I think this is fully determined upon. Men who have gone to the lengths that some of the leading Republicans have to secure the majority of the electoral votes will not hesitate at any other act necessary to make their success complete. Men do not descend to such acts as they have without being resolved to accomplish if possible the ends at which they aim.

I remitted a draft of $1000.00 to Capt. Hooper, Prest. Deseret National Bank in payment of my note held by the bank and which he was kind enough to endorse. The note was payable on the 15th of this month.

12 December 1876 • Tuesday

Tuesday 12

Dictated a number of letters. Called at P. O. Dep’t. to see Mr. Vail about the appointment of Bro. Jos. Hall, Ogden, as route agent on the Utah Northern. He was absent from the city. A man by the name of Mills succeeded in borrowing $50.00 from me. I expect I do wrong in loaning people money as I frequently do. I have lent various amounts to one and another since I have been in Washington and I scarcely remember an instance where it has been repaid. Yet it is very hard for me, if a man comes and tells me he is in a strait, and promises that he will pay, to refuse him if I have it. This man promises faithfully that he will pay it the day after he gets to Salt Lake. I wrote a long letter to Captain Hooper enclosing Mills’ note.

13 December 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday 13

Dictating letters in the morning. Called at P. O. Dep’t, about Bro Halls appointment, and found Mr. Vail still absent. Brought his case to the attention of 1st Assistant P. M. General. Discussion to-day in the House on Mr. Bland’s silver bill, which passed, and the making the Burlington & Missouri R. R. a branch of the Union Pacific, which did not pass and was re-committed. Dictated two articles for the Juvenile. Received a letter from Pres’t Young <dated the 3rd> in which he says: “We are expecting that you will have to pass through severe times at Washington, for the spirit in both parties is rife to lay waste the heritage of each other. But we have all confidence in our Heavenly Father, our Savior and the heavenly hosts that their watchcare will be over you by day and by night and not a hair of your head will be harmed.” I wrote a letter in reply giving him all the news.

14 December 1876 • Thursday

Thursday, 14

Dictated a letter to Bro’s John W. Young and D. H. Wells giving them my views on the political situation, news, etc. Afterwards noticing in the papers that Bro. Young was in New York I had the letter addressed to Bro. Wells alone. Also dictated a letter to Geo. Lambert. Went to the Treasury Dept. with a copy of the laws as far as printed which had been sent to the 1st Comptroller by Bro’s Smoot, Smith & Burton. He was pleased with the work and desired the whole volume when completed and also a copy of the contract; if not too long, which the committee had made with the printer. I had an interview with the Attorney-General and gave him the papers in the Ann Eliza case, calling his attention particularly to the review of the case, and said if he would read that I should be very much obliged as he could from that get the exact position. He had a number of inquiries to make respecting the officials and the status of that case. Some charges had been made by Marshal Nelson for transporting a prisoner to Detroit that were incorrect; and he had inquires to make respecting Marshal Nelson as an officer. I told him he was one of the best officers we had had, and I thought that if a wrong charge had been made, it had been done with no view to defraud the dep’t; I thought him an honest man from what I had seen of him. At the House the P. O. bill was discussed. I discovered in examining the estimates for appropriations that no estimate had been made for the legislative expenses of the next Assembly of our Territory.

15 December 1876 • Friday

Friday 15

Repaired to the Treasury Dept this morning and after some investigation learned from Maj. Power, the head of the Warrant and Appropriation Office, that no estimate had been sent in by the secretary of the Territory for the legislative expenses, and having no basis of this kind to act upon they could not put it in the estimates. I told him of the wrong that had been perpetrated upon the last assembly by the conduct of exgov. Woods and U. S. Marshal Maxwell; that they had diverted the funds of to the department of justice so as to help the marshal in his position by which the members of the assembly served the 40 days without receiving a cent in compensation. It was a regular stealing operation. I addressed a letter (see letter book page [blank]) to the Secretary of the Treasury, and was promised that it should receive immediate attention. Called at P. O. Dept to try to get Bro. Hall made route ag’t from Ogden on the Utah Northern but found that the place had been filled by transfer. I was promised by Mr. Vail that in the event of a vacancy which he expected soon, Bro Hall’s case should receive favorable consideration. Some speeches were made in the House upon the Louisiana matter by Hale of Maine, Cox of N. Y. & Spencer of Louisiana. It is easy to discern how strong the feeling upon these subjects is, but the excitement an allusion to them occasions. There is a great deal of pent-up feeling, that men are keeping down, especially the Democrats, because they think it prudent to do so. When it does break out it will be very strong. Ben: Perley Poore was asking me about my views on the position of affairs. We were interrupted before our conversation was finished, but I gave him some of the views of the Latter-day Saints, alluded to the predictions that Joseph had made. He said that affairs looked darker to him now than they did in ‘60, before the war broke out, and is fearful that we are on the verge of great convulsions. Thoughtful, serious men appear all impressed with the gravity of the situation. Politicians, many of them, either shut their eyes to the actual condition of affairs or else are blind to what is occurring or try to deceive themselves and others, for thy [they], as a rule, talk as though there was no danger of trouble, and affect to have great confidence in the good judgment of the American people.

16 December 1876 • Saturday

<Saturday 16>

Called at the Land and Patent Offices on business. Wrote letters to Dr. Roberts, and my wives Sarah Jane and Eliza. Dictated letter to the President; Bro’s Musser, Hall and Naile, and Jno N. Whitney Esq. The House finished its discussion of the P. O. appropriation bill and passed it. At 1 o’clock attended to the special order which was the delivery of eulogies on the late Speaker. A large number of gentlemen addressed the House. S. S. Cox of New York made the most elaborate speech of the occasion. Mr. Monroe, of Ohio, delivered a very nice analysis of Mr. Kerr’s character. John Q came to the House and told me that Bro. John W. had arrived. He telegraphed me this morning from Baltimore asking my address, and intimating his intention of spending Sunday with us. We dined to-gether at Willard’s. After which he and I called upon Mrs. Kimball and had a very pleasant interview. He then filled an appointment with C. P. Huntington of the Central Pacific and then took Jno Q and myself to the theatre where we say [saw] the play of Monte Christo, with Fechter as the principal character.

17 December 1876 • Sunday

Sunday 17

Bro John W. slept at my rooms last night. We had a good time visiting as we laid in bed talking about one thing and another until 3 o’clock p.m., a most extraordinary way of visiting. I never did the like before. We got up and dressed had dinner after which we again called upon Mrs. Kimball, and he then took the night train for New York. Received a letter from my wife Elizabeth from which I was glad to learn they were all well, and the progress of the labor on the new house.

18 December 1876 • Monday

Monday, 18.

Wrote to Commissioner of Pensions, Bro. Naile and my wife Elizabeth. Dictated an article for the Juvenile. Stormy morning, snowed most of the day. Streets are very slippery. Nothing of particular moment transpired at the House.

19 December 1876 • Tuesday

<Tuesday 19>

Last night was very cold but the sun rose beautifully this morning and it was a clear, pleasant day. Called at Treasury Dep’t to see about answer to my letter upon the subject of the appropriation for the Legislative expenses. Business at the House was reports of committees. Eulogies on the character of Jno. Winthrop and Sam. Adams of Mass, whose statues were placed in the hall of statuary, that is, the old hall of the House of Representatives, were delivered by Messrs Hoar and Warren of Mass, and Garfield of Ohio. Dictated letters to my brother Angus, and Capt. Hooper, and an article for the Juvenile. Wrote a letter to my aunt Catharine of Cleveland in reply to hers.

20 December 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday 20

Dictated a few letters. At the House the Committee on Military Affairs reported a substitute for the bill which I introduced for the compensation of W. J. Allred and A. A. Noon for their improvements on land which was afterwards taken up for the Fort Cameron reservation at Beaver. Mr. Conger of Mich. made a point of order on the bill thinking it ought to be referred to the committee of the whole. Such an action would be equivalent to killing it. I went to him and explained the character of the bill and he withdrew his point of order. Judge Holman opposed the bill but Gen. Terry, who reported the bill from the committee, and myself, made explanations and it passed the House. The substitute provides for the appointment by the Sec. of War of a board of officers to value the improvements. Wrote to my wife Martha.

21 December 1876 • Thursday

Thursday 21

Dictated a letter to Pres’t Young and an article for the Juvenile. I had an interview with the committee on Appropriations respecting the appropriation for legislative expenses. I drew out the items and submitted them to Mr. Atkins of Tenn. who promised to see that they were inserted. In looking through a book to-day called Tellham’s Tour over the Isle of Man I found on p. 183 the statement that there is an inscription in the chancel of Peel church to Capt. Syl. Radcliffe of Knockaloe, buried Dec 30, 1731, aged 78. This was a man of some note and as near as I can find was the grandfather of two of my great-grandfathers, Sylvester and David Callister. Their mother was Leonora Radcliffe of Knockaloe and it is from that branch that Leonora is in our family, my grand mother Cannon being named Leonora after her father’s, David Callister’s, mother, Leonora Radcliffe Callister.

22 December 1876 • Friday

Friday 22

Called upon Vice-president Ferry in relation to Mr. Sumner Howard, District Attorney. He informed me that Mr. Howard would soon be here and he thought there would be no necessity of doing anything in his case until he arrived. The House was occupied with private bills and adjourned early. The weather is very unpleasant, and the streets are so slippery as to be dangerous to walk on. I saw Senator Barnum of Conn. and desired to obtain a letter of introduction from him to Mr. Tilden, which he had promised me. He said he would write one with the greatest of pleasure but that if we could meet in New York it would be attended with greater effect for him to give me a personal introduction which he would do with pleasure. He thought he would be able to say more in a personal interview than in a letter which I thought most likely. So we have agreed to meet at New York on Wednesday evening for that purpose. I wrote a letter to Bro. Jno. W telling him of my intention to go to New York.

23 December 1876 • Saturday

Saturday 23

Dictated a number of letters then went to Treasury Dep’t to see about Mrs. Dabrowski’s claim for Uncle John Taylor. I was a few minutes late in reaching the capitol, and found to my surprise the House adjourned. They had only been in session a few minutes. There were not half enough members present for a quorum. I received a dispatch from Bro. John W. Young in reply to my letter informing him of my intention to go to New York on Sunday night, in which he says that he starts west to-night for home and regrets that he cannot see me again.

24 December 1876 • Sunday

Sunday 24

We are in the habit of meeting every morning according to the order. We did so this morning as usual. Dictated a number of letters and made preparations for our journey to New York.

25 December 1876 • Monday

Monday 25

Took the train at 9.20 last night for New York. We put up at the St. Nicholas, which hotel we reached between 7 & 8 this morning. Remained there until a little after noon, awaiting the arrival of Rudger Clawson, Bro. John W. having said that he would meet us. We then walked up Broadway and took a car to Central Park. The ground was covered with snow but there were immense crowds of people pressing to the skating pond. This was so crowded they could hardly skate and to make it still more unpleasant the ice was covered with snow. Went to Wallack’s Theatre in the evening, and saw “Shaughraun” Mr. Boucicault’s famous Irish comedy. The acting was very good and the scenery was very fine.

26 December 1876 • Tuesday

Tuesday 26

Went to Metropolitan art museum[.] The day was stormy and unpleasant[.] From there went to Houston Street Ferry, crossed to Williamsburg, then crossed back to Roosevelt St. Ferry on this side. Took this route to show Jno Q. the Sound and the piers of the new bridge crossing it. Went around by Castle Garden where we got a good view of New York Bay. In the evening went to Union Square Theatre and saw the emotional drama – Led Astray.

27 December 1876 • Wednesday

Wednesday 27

I called at Benedict Hall & Co’s & saw Mr. Jno. N. Niels. Then delivered a letter of introduction that Mr. Landers of Connecticut gave me to one of his partners. I examined the goods of their manufacture with a good deal of interest. They are in the hardware and cutlery line. Went to Jersey City and saw the Cunard Steamship Abysynnia start for Europe. In the evening Rudger Clawson called upon us.

28 December 1876 • Thursday

Thursday 28

I spent the day in finding Mr. Barnum of Conn. who had promised to meet me and introduce me to Gov. Tilden. I did not find him until nearly 5 o’clock and then learned the Gov. Tilden had gone to Albany. We arranged to meet at 8 and he would introduce me to Col. Pelton, the governor’s nephew, and when the Governor returned he (Pelton) should introduce me to him. At 8 we proceeded to Gov. Tilden’s residence. In the course of the evening Mr. Wight (S. M Wight, I presume) a noted politician came in. Spent a very pleasant evening with Col. Peton & his wife. He thought his uncle would be back on Saturday, but was not certain If he did not return then he certainly would on Tuesday. He had gone to Albany to prepare for the inauguration of his successor, Gov. Robinson, which would take place in Albany on New Year’s day. Gov. Tilden’s mansion is very fine. and his library into which we were shown and where we sat is very extensive.

29 December 1876 • Friday

Friday 29

The day was stormy. I called upon Mr. Neals at Benedict, Hall & Co’s[.] Upon his invitation I went to Niblo’s Theatre and witnessed “Azurine”.

30 December 1876 • Saturday

Saturday 30

I called at Gov. Tilden’s residence, and was informed that he had not yet returned from Albany. Called at Benedict, Hall & Co’s. In the afternoon went to the Astor Library. In the evening accompanied Jno. Q to the depot[.] He started for Washington at 9.20 p.m.

31 December 1876 • Sunday

Sunday, 31st

Rudger Clawson called upon me and informed me about the time of the meeting of the Saints at Williamsburg and promised to call. He called at the hotel at 2.30, the meeting being held at 3. There were but few Saints present. We met at the meeting Elders John Druce and Jno. R. Midgley who had been sent down from the valley on missions. They are laboring in this place and vicinity. The Sacrament was administered. Bro. Druce made a few remarks and I followed, speaking about an hour. Bro. Bywater is still President of the branch; a good many of the people have emigrated. Sister Blackburn and Bro. Peter A. French, who resides at her house invited me to take tea with them at Brooklyn. Bro. Clawson and myself went there and had a very interesting time. She seems like a very superior woman. We stayed until about 11 o’clock, reached the hotel at 12. The chimes were ringing and all the bells and steam whistles in the neighborhood were making a noise, as I went to bed, for the incoming new year.

On hand1

1508.60

[preprinted] Cash AccountJanuary.

Date

RECEIVED

PAID

Serjeant-at-Arms

Dr.

Cr.

By Salary

416

00

Jan.

4

417

00

Mileage

961

60

Feb.

4

Salary

416

00

To Draft

100

00

278

00

Dec.

10

38

00

11

20

00

18

50

00

24

150

00

Jan.

14

50

00

18

A Bruce Taylor

50

00

21

Self

50

00

28

150

00

Feb.

5

50

00

10

150

00

19

50

00

24

60

00

26

E. W. Tullidge

100

00

Mar

1

Self Rent for us and Bro. Milner

120

00

2

W. H. Barnum of Democratic Committee

50

00

3

Self

35

00

75

00

18

40

00

4

By Salary

417

00

25

to Self

75

00

″ S. Clawson for goods

13

00

2627

60

1704

00

Cash AccountFebruary

date.

received.

paid.

From Jan. 19 to Feb. 21 stamps 8.70, lunch 9.80

papers 2.67, vichy 20¢, cars 2.09, pamphlets 4.01,

perfume 50¢, alcohol 1.75; clothing, including

umbrella, 17.35; trip to Uncle Joseph’s funeral 19.50;

fruit 4.11, Dr Parsons (lady) 10.00, stout 8.75,

on hand

Mrs. C. for rent, meals, washing, &c., 224.65; Mrs.

1507.20 a discrepancy of $50 which I suppose have drawn but not chg’d previous to Jan. 18

Kimball 1.25; poor 15; missing 63¢; Henderson, cor. of

Des. News 35.00; Bro. Milner 31.75; Revised statutes-

at-large for Geo. Peacock, Geo. Bean and Jas Lewis

9.00; explorations of valley of Amazon for Uncle

Taylor 2.50;

From Feb. 21 to April 9th stamps 4.72; and for

Democratic party $50,00/100; Henderson 15.00; hair

on hand

cutting 75; papers 3.19; fruit &c 5.70; boots 14.00; tie

$1007.88

85¢; amusements 6.25; poor 11¢; books for self &

Mary Alice 8.35; lunch 11.85

Cash Account—March

date.

received.

paid.

Bro’t forwd from Jan.

2627

60

1704

00

Mar. 30

To Cassel, Petter & Galpin for electros

99

40

31

″ Rent

120

00

Apr. 3

″ Philadelphia

50

00

6

″ boots

14

00

4

By salary

417

00

10

To A. H. C’s books

3

92

12

″ Self

35

00

13

″ Lippincott for printing argument

40

00

″ Self

55

00

″″

30

00

″″

49

00

″ Goods from N. Y.

150

00

″ Clothing for self

100

00

″ 29

″ Rent &c

150

00

″ Self

53

00

May 5

″ Silk

5

40

″″

″ Self

45

00

4

By salary

417

00

8

To self

200

00

22

″ C. A. Eldredge attorney

300

00

″ Obed Taylor architect

200

00

31

″ Rent, &c

150

00

June 2

″ Phonographer & Tailor

60

00

6

″ Milner &c

100

00

4

By Salary

416

00

1250

3713

72

3877

60

Cash AccountApril

date.

received.

paid.

Bro’t Forwd from Feb. column.

fare 5,80; ice cream 75¢; vichy 1.00; boots &c 18¢;

expense a/c (dispatch 2.50, trip to Phil. 15.27; freight

on peaches 4.00; papers 30¢) 22.07; rent 190.00; rent

and money to Bro. Milner 94.00; earrings 18.00;

medicine 1.65; stout 10.00: Mrs. C. 186.22 <201.22> for

meals, washing &c; lunch 6.79; fruit 5.11; porters,

pages &c 3.09; papers 2.26; fare 12.23; stamps 6.94;

poor 3.61; Mrs. C. 304.35; alcohol 2.00; doctor 5.00;

ring 8.00; brooch 25¢; <silver> children 3.00; <Mary Alice>

fan 1.00; clothing for self 102.70; do. for family 148.40;

<silk> purse 5.00; Rent 95.00; Bro Milner 25.00; Photo’s

25.30; trunk 10.00; paid to patent office for Taylor

Bro’s. 18.75; dispatches 1.13; perfume 90¢; badges 50¢;

camphor 25¢; Canfield children 5.00; sundries 1.85;

locket 2.00

Cash AccountMay

date.

received.

paid.

Trip to Gen. K. Phil. & return 14,02; newspaper 5.00;

loaned 20,00; expressage on argument 1.15;

Mrs. C. for household & other expenses $267.00; Rent $285 00/100

clothing $49.80; lunch 9.95; fruit 4.36; Wm Johnson

5.50; porters 1.90; poor 43¢; stamps 4.90; silver for

children $8.00; carriage 5.50; fare 26.02; fare to

Philadelphia 22.75; newspapers 1.43; J. F. Wells 21.75;

exhibition 5,00; pills, squeezer &c 1.15; express 75¢;

tricks for children $24 00/100 books 19.50; photos

15.00; expense at Philadelphia $30.00 box for books

$3.23; O, Taylor $200 00/100; speeches 1.50; stamps

40¢; boys 50¢

Cash AccountJune

On hand 663.28

368.28

Cash AccountJuly

date.

received.

paid.

Bro’t Forwd from May <March> column

3877

69

3713

72

June 14

To Gibson Bro’s printers

62

60

″ Self

35

00

20

″″

40

00

30

″″

100

00

July 1

″″

90

00

5

″″

40

00

4

By salary

417

00

To M. Pratt

10

00

″ Milner & Wells

50

00

″ Self

55

00

July 21

″″

180

00

26

″ Attorney (Eldredge)

100

00

28

″ Self

15

25

″ Rent

30

00

31

″ Watches &c

72

00

″ Self

28

00

Aug. 1

″″

100

00

9

″ Mrs. C’s Expenses <home>

75

00

12

″ W. H. Barnum of Dem. committee

50

00

″ speeches

2

85

″ Self

25

00

″″

50

00

″ Attorney (Eldredge)

84

00

By Salary

417

00

″ Cash from home

500

00

To Self

203

18

5211

60

5211

60

[preprinted] Centennial Notes.

Paid to and for Bro. Milner

Lodging 1.50, meals 3.75, washing 1.60 =

6.85

Feb. 6, 10.00; Feb. 14. 10.00; Feb. 21, 10.00; cars 25¢ =

30.25

Mar. 1 Lodging for month

25.00

2, 9.00; 17, $10.00; 24, $5.00; 31, $20.00

44.00

31 Rent $25, 00/100; washing, &c, 7.00;

32.00

Apt. 31 Rent $25.00; washing 5.50;

30.50

May 31 Rent $25,00; money $5.00; money $40 00/100

70.00

Washing

.80

_______

$239.40

June 7 lunch 2.00 for journey; gratuity

4.00

to servant girl 1.00

_______

$243.40]\

Footnotes

  1. [1]Undated, in pencil.