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Susan Brownell Anthony

15 February 1820–13 March 1906

Born 15 Feb. 1820 in Adams, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts.[1] Daughter of Daniel Anthony and Lucy Read.[2] Worked as a governess in Easton, Washington Co., New York, 1837–1838.[3] Taught school, 1839–1849.[4] Appointed secretary and state agent of the Rochester, Monroe Co., New York, branch of the Daughters of Temperance, 1849.[5] Cofounder and chair of the Women’s State Temperance Society.[6] Lobbied for the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1856–1861.[7] Successfully campaigned to expand New York’s Married Women’s Property Act, 1860.[8] Petitioned Congress for universal  suffrage, Jan. 1866.[9] Began publishing the Revolution with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Parker Pillsbury, Jan. 1868.[10] Appointed as a delegate to the Democratic Convention, 1868.[11] Charter member and chair of the executive committee of the National Woman Suffrage Association.[12] Lectured with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in Salt Lake City, 21 June 1871.[13] Founding member of the International Conference of Women, 25 Mar. 1888, in Washington DC.[14] Merged the National Woman Suffrage Association with the American Suffrage Association, 1890.[15] Elected vice president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), 1890; served as president of NAWSA, 1892–1900.[16] Returned to Utah Territory to lecture at a suffrage conference, May 1895.[17] Attended the International Conference of Women in London, Apr. 1899, and in Berlin, 1904.[18] Bequeathed a gold ring to EBW.[19] Died 13 Mar. 1906 at Rochester.[20]

 

[1] Papers of Susan B. Anthony, 1837–1954, A/A628c, seq. 2, 4, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (https://iiif.lib.harvard.edu/manifests/view/drs:46005145$1i, accessed 8 Mar. 2018). Richard B. Morris and Jeffrey B. Morris, Encyclopedia of American History, 7th ed. (New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 1953–1996), 980.

[2] Papers of Susan B. Anthony, 1837–1954, A/A628c, seq. 2, 4, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (https://iiif.lib.harvard.edu/manifests/view/drs:46005145$1i, accessed 8 Mar. 2018). George Norbury Mackenzie, Colonial Families of the United States of America (Baltimore: Seaforth Press, 1907), 18.

[3] Ida Husted Harper, The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1 (Indianapolis and Kansas City, MO: Bowen-Merrill, 1899), 24.

[4] Ida Husted Harper, The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1 (Indianapolis and Kansas City, MO: Bowen-Merrill, 1899), 39–44, 49, 55. Richard B. Morris and Jeffrey B. Morris, Encyclopedia of American History, 7th ed. (New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 1953–1996), 980.

[5] Ida Husted Harper, The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1 (Indianapolis and Kansas City, MO: Bowen-Merrill, 1899), 53, 68. “Her Work: Temperance Worker,” National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House (http://susanbanthonyhouse.org/blog/her-work/, accessed 3 Mar. 2018).

[6] Ida Husted Harper, The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1 (Indianapolis and Kansas City, MO: Bowen-Merrill, 1899), 66–67. Alice Felt Tyler, Freedom’s Ferment: Phases of American Social History to 1860 (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1944), 448.

[7] Ida Husted Harper, The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1 (Indianapolis and Kansas City, MO: Bowen-Merrill, 1899), 137, 148. Judith E. Harper, “Not for Ourselves Alone: Biography,” (http://www.pbs.org/stantonanthony/resources/index.html, accessed 15 Mar. 2018).

[8] Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, eds., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 1, 1848–1861 (Rochester, NY: Charles Mann, 1887), 256.

[9] “Petition for Universal Suffrage, Signed by Elizabeth Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and others,” data and images, Universal Suffrage, Featured Congressional Documents, The Center for Legislative Archives, National Archives, Archives.gov (https://www.archives.gov/legislative/features/suffrage, accessed 15 Mar. 2018).

[10] Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, eds., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 1, 1848–1861 (Rochester, NY: Charles Mann, 1887), 46. Revolution, 8 Jan. 1868 (http://digitalcollections.lclark.edu/items/show/9833, accessed 15 Mar. 2018).

[11] “Tammany Hall and Susan B. Anthony,” Revolution, 18 June 1868, 1 (http://digitalcollections.lclark.edu//items/show/9641, accessed 15 Mar. 2018).

[12] Ida Husted Harper, The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1 (Indianapolis and Kansas City, MO: Bowen-Merrill, 1899), 326–328. Ida Harper, ed., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 5 (Rochester, NY: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1922), forward.

[13] “Susan B. Anthony at Salt Lake,” Salt Lake Tribune, 19 July 1871, 4. Advertisement, Deseret Evening News, 21 June 1871, 2. “Woman’s Suffrage,” Salt Lake Daily Herald, 30 June 1871, 3.

[14] Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper, eds., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4 (Rochester, NY: Hollenbeck Press, 1902), 125. “Founding Members of the International Council of Women,” International Council of Women (http://www.icw-cif.com/01/03.php, accessed 22 Mar. 2018).   

[15] “The National American Woman Suffrage Association,” Library of Congress (https://www.loc.gov/collections/national-american-woman-suffrage-association/articles-and-essays/the-national-american-woman-suffrage-association/, accessed 15 Mar. 2018).

[16] Dictionary of American Biography, ed. Allen Johnson, vol. 1 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1928), 320 Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper, eds., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4 (Rochester, NY: Hollenbeck Press, 1902), 233.

[17] “Women Suffragists,” Salt Lake Tribune, 12 May 1895, 8. “Two Famous Women,” Salt Lake Herald, 13 May 1895, 8.

[18] “The World of Women,” Salt Lake Herald, 2 Apr. 1899, 23. “Delegates to Go to London,” Salt Lake Herald, 7 June 1899, 9. Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper, eds., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4 (Rochester, NY: Hollenbeck Press, 1902), 352–353. Ida Harper, ed., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 5 (Rochester, NY: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1922), 87. Charlotte Perkins Gilman Digital Collection, Papers, 1846–1961, folder 7, International Congress of Women, Berlin 1904: Correspondence (http://schlesinger.radcliffe.harvard.edu/onlinecollections/gilman/item/13727763/27), accessed 2 Apr. 2018), seq. 27.

[19] Carol Cornwall Madsen, Emmeline B. Wells: An Intimate History (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 2017), 420, 420n5.

[20] “New York Death Index, 1880–1956,” database and images, Ancestry.com (https://search.ancestry.com, accessed 15 Mar. 2018), Susan Brownell Anthony; Rochester, New York, certificate 10978. Richard B. Morris and Jeffrey B. Morris, Encyclopedia of American History, 7th ed. (New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 1953–1996), 980.