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Clarissa Harlowe Barton

25 December 1821–12 April 1912

Born 25 Dec. 1821 in Oxford, Worchester Co., Massachusetts.[1] Daughter of Stephen Barton Jr. and Sarah Stone.[2] Began teaching, 1839; founded a school for millworkers’ children, 1845, and established the first free public school in Bordentown, Burlington Co., New Jersey, 1852.[3] Moved to Washington DC; worked for the U.S. Patent Office, 1854.[4] Instrumental in facilitating the care of wounded soldiers during the Civil War; collected and delivered supplies to battlefields, 1861–1865.[5] Established the Missing Soldiers Office, 1865; successfully petitioned Congress for funds, Feb. 1866.[6] Met Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony; aligned herself with the suffrage movement, 1867.[7] While in Europe in 1868, learned about the International Red Cross; provided aid during the Franco-Prussian War.[8] Founder and president of the American Red Cross, 1881–1904.[9] Attended a reception for the National Council of Women in Washington DC, 22 Feb. 1891; EBW and Utah delegates were also in attendance.[10] EBW visited her home in Glen Echo, Montgomery Co., Maryland, 1901.[11] While in Washington DC to attend the First Conference of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance, EBW spent the evening visiting with her, 12 Feb. 1902; wrote a verse to EBW and the Utah delegation titled “Adieu to My Beloved Friends of Utah.”[12] Died 12 Apr. 1912 in Glen Echo; buried in Oxford.[13]

 

[1] Oxford, MA, Town Clerk, Vital Records, 1714–1894, p. 598, Clarissa Harlow, 25 Dec. 1821, microfilm 754010, DGS 7009522, image 288/491, FHL. “Family Tree,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org, accessed 3 June 2020), Clarissa Harlowe Barton (LHV5-KBG).

[2] Oxford, MA, Town Clerk, Vital Records, 1714–1894, p. 598, Clarissa Harlow, 25 Dec. 1821, microfilm 754010, DGS 7009522, image 288/491, FHL. Oxford, MA, Town Clark, Marriages and Intentions of Marriage, 1799–1839, p. 8, Stephen Barton and Sally Stone, 22 Apr. 1804, microfilm 859254, DGS 4269389, image 215/516, FHL. Vital Records of Oxford, MA, to the End of the Year 1849 (Worcester, MA: Franklin P. Rice, 1905), 109.

[3] “Biography,” Clara Barton Museum (https://www.clarabartonmuseum.org/bio/, accessed 20 May 2020).

[4] “Biography,” Clara Barton Museum (https://www.clarabartonmuseum.org/bio/, accessed 20 May 2020).

[5] “Biography,” Clara Barton Museum (https://www.clarabartonmuseum.org/bio/, accessed 20 May 2020).

[6] “Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office: 1856–1868,” Clara Barton Museum (https://www.clarabartonmuseum.org/bio/, accessed 20 May 2020). Memorial of Clara Barton, Feb. 1866 (https://history.house.gov/HouseRecord/Detail/15032436224, accessed 20 May 2020).

[7] “Clara Barton Chronology 1861–1869,” Clara Barton National Historic Site Maryland (https://www.nps.gov/clba/learn/kidsyouth/chron2.htm, accessed 20 May 2020).

[8]  “Biography,” Clara Barton Museum (https://www.clarabartonmuseum.org/bio/, accessed 20 May 2020). “Clara Barton Chronology 1861–1869,” Clara Barton National Historic Site Maryland (https://www.nps.gov/clba/learn/kidsyouth/chron2.htm, accessed 20 May 2020). “Clara Barton Chronology 1870–1912,” Clara Barton National Historic Site Maryland (https://www.nps.gov/clba/learn/kidsyouth/chron3.htm, accessed 20 May 2020).

[9] “A Brief History of the American Red Cross,” American Red Cross (https://www.redcross.org/content/dam/redcross/National/history-full-history.pdf, accessed 20 May 2020).

[10] EBW, Diary, 22 Feb. 1891.

[11] EBW, Diary, 1–2 Mar. 1901

[12] EBW, Diary, 12 Feb. 1902. Susa Young Gates, “The Red Cross,” Relief Society Magazine, Sept. 1917, 496–497.

[13] Massachusetts State Archives, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1911–1915, Deaths, 1912, vol. 79, p. 288, Clara Barton, 12 Apr. 1912, microfilm 2399101, DGS 4284177, image 1892/2129, FHL.